Take a look at Company Theatre’s new logo as co-founder Zoe Bradford discusses the Company Theatre’s exciting future

The Company Theatre is kicking off 2020 with a new look.

Not only are they starting a fun-filled new season that includes The Who’s Tommy, Bring it On, Rock of Ages, and Fun Home, but they recently unveiled their new logo.  Click here to see their new logo.

Sleepless Critic had a chance to interview Zoe Bradford about the Company Theatre’s upcoming projects, their vision for the future, and even walked away with some good advice.  Click here for the full list the Company Theatre’s 2020 season.

Company Theatre co-founders Jordie Saucerman and Zoe Bradford

Company Theatre co-founders Jordie Saucerman and Zoe Bradford, courtesy of Company Theatre

Sleepless Critic:  Congratulations on Company Theatre’s recent 40th anniversary. So much has happened in the last few years from the upgraded, painted theatre with new seating to new, original productions.  Please tell me more about that.

Zoe Bradford:  Now that the theatre is beautiful, we’re envisioning the potential of our outdoor property.  We’ve done a lot with Academy of the Company Theatre (A.C.T.) with an expanded outdoor stage and new pavilion.  We have a growing summer program that has been at full capacity.   Not only do we need more space and with everybody addicted to their screens, I believe in getting kids outside.  We have a path to the pond front and we’ve held classes there for water coloring and creative writing.

ACT summer program

A group of past A.C.T. students Photo courtesy of The Company Theatre

Freedom for creative expression has been the key for me, so I know it is the key for them.  It’s why I desperately wanted my own theatre and thank God it happened.  It’s not stimulating to work in the confines of another person’s building or organization.  That’s one of the draws here.

SC:  You once said you chose popular shows that sell, but in the last few years, The Company Theatre has been delving into uncharted waters a bit with musicals such as Carrie the Musical, Lizzie Borden, and American Idiot.

ZB:  It’s financially difficult to do that, but we are trying to give the young people what they want.  Lizzie Borden went well because people love local history and some said they have been to her house.  It’s a gruesome tale, but it was also a nice psychological thriller.

We changed how we choose our shows a little, but we still have to please our general audience and offer something for the family, something mature, and our team knows their demographic well and what will be successful.

I’m passionate about big musicals and there’s nothing like the thrill of a live orchestra.  People in the professional theatre world, mentors, and colleagues say they will put eight pieces in here and do a lot of synthetic and prerecord.  You can make a lot of money that way, but we can’t do that.  Michael Joseph said that is standard while he was here and we’ve maintained it.

SC:  What shows do you still dream of doing?

ZB:  I’d love to do WickedThe Hunchback of Notre Dame, and I’m also waiting to do Mamma Mia!  We’ll get to it.  It’s all about rights and I’m sure there are new shows coming out that I’d love to get my hands on.

As a non-profit, whatever comes in has to support what we are doing and help us be self-sustaining.  Grants, gifts, and tax deductible donations are the key.  We have better opportunities for community support such as new packages for corporate sponsorship due to having higher end computer capabilities, a better website, and a ticketing service that allows people who wish to support us to advertise.

SC:  What has been your most challenging musical?

ZB:  The Wizard of Oz because the movie is a masterpiece and any derivation from the film would be a disappointment for those who truly love it.  People would fight me on that, but if you take on The Wiz, you can do what you want because no one has a preset notion of it.

The Company Theatre The Wiz auditions

Company Theatre’s ‘The Wiz’ auditions will be held on January 22. Photo courtesy of the Company Theatre

SC: The Wiz is also part of Company Theatre’s 2020 season.  What advice would you give someone taking on a business in theatre or similar?

ZB:  It’s highly competitive.  Know your vision, don’t give up, and try to think of something that someone else hasn’t already thought of.  Be fresh and original when you can and make sure people know of your existence without being obnoxious about it.  We still struggle with it.  Some people say they didn’t know a theatre is here.

SC:  What do you envision for the Company Theatre’s future?

ZB:  We have to keep growing and we set up the Legacy Fund.  Our money rolls in and out with the tide as any non-profit would, but we’re actively fundraising to ensure another 40 years and beyond.

For over ten years, I’ve wanted to design a new logo.  I remember sitting at a little drafting table back in the 70s and hand drew it when we didn’t have any money or resources.

With art being cut in classrooms and attending theatre in Boston can be so expensive, we’re looking to keep this going so it’s accessible for everyone and expand.  I can see us taking on more property and A.C.T. quadrupling over the next ten years.  We’re not a community theatre anymore, but a year round professional and we’ll evolve again.  We provide many jobs for people, but the other part of my vision is to create more jobs for artisans in the area.  The more people that are working and inspiring people, the better.

Company Theatre's The Who's Tommy

Photo courtesy of the Company Theatre

The Company Theatre kicks off their 2020 season with A.C.T’s The Who’s Tommy from January 17 through January 26.  Click here for tickets and here for more on Company Theatre’s 2020 season.  You can also get tickets by calling the box office at 781-871-2787.  Located at 30 Accord Park Drive in Norwell, Massachusetts, click here for how to support the Company Theatre and be sure to follow them on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

 

Sleepless Beyond the Stage: Building a dream with Richard Bento, President of South Shore Theatre Works

Building a dream always has its share of surprises and challenges. However, with determination, hard work, and more than a touch of luck, those sought after dreams can become a reality.  Sleepless Beyond the Stage explores the reality of making that dream come true, whether by building an organization, finally bringing that dream production to life, or starting a group that makes a difference.

Richard Bento, Executive Director and President of South Shore Theatre Works (SSTW) checked in with Sleepless Critic a few years ago as the theater was just getting on its feet.  Boasting a successful run of Seussical in December, SSTW’s upcoming productions include Blithe Spirit, Ordinary Days, and Chicago.  Richard Bento talks about how this Massachusetts theater has grown in a short time.  Click here for more information, auditions, and for tickets.

SSTW seussical the musical

Past performances of ‘Seussical the Musical’ December 2018

Sleepless Critic: Please tell me about your background and what inspired you to start South Shore Theatre Works?

Richard Bento:  I’ve participated in community and semi-professional theater throughout Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Georgia, and San Francisco.  One of my goals was to have a group of my own who share the same mission and passion I had for the arts.

A few years ago, I decided to participate in theater here and assist another community theater group.  I fell in love with the people.  We shared the same passion.  When we were at a crossroads needing to decide whether we were going to bring this other group to another level or start our own with other people who shared that same drive, I decided to put together South Shore Theatre Works.

SSTW Blithe Spirit

South Shore Theatre Works presents ‘Blithe Spirit’ February 15-17 in Randolph, MA Photo courtesy of South Shore Theatre Works

JD:  What would you say to those who are considering starting a community theater?

Americana Theatre Company’s Michael Kirkland and Jennifer Martin talk bringing epic musical ‘Man of La Mancha’ to the South Shore

Americana Theatre Company is taking the South Shore on an epic quest in the multiple Tony Award-winning musical, Man of La Mancha at Spire Center for Performing Arts in Plymouth, Massachusetts through Sunday, July 29.  Starring TV personality Scott Wahle, a fascinating cast, and featuring a memorable score that includes the classic number, The Impossible Dream, Man of La Mancha is based on Cervantes’ masterpiece Don Quixote.

American Theatre Company’s Jennifer Martin and director Dr. Michael Kirkland discuss going through 500 audition tapes, their current season, and why Man of La Mancha sometimes felt like a farce.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Sleepless Critic:  This is your first time directing Man of La Mancha.

Michael Kirkland:  It is, but it is also my seventh La Mancha.  I’ve been blessed to portray Sancho Panza four times professionally.  I’ve also played The Barber, have choreographed the combat and violence in the show maybe six of the seven times, but have always longed to direct it.

SC:  Doing a show that many times makes you that much more prepared of what works and what doesn’t.

MK:  Directing the show is a real blessing because I have formulated well germinated ideas about the piece and I finally have an opportunity to experiment with those ideas, but I never lock myself out of the possibility of change.

SC:  Although Man of La Mancha is a comedy, Americana Theatre Company’s past production of The Three Musketeers also featured swordplay and took place in a similar time period.  Did the actors train the way they did for The Three Musketeers?

MK:  Yes, it is a physical show with combat fighting ranging from realistic to stylized to serious to comical narratives and techniques.  Similar challenges but different than swordplay.  Swordplay has more rules and challenges that come with it.  This is all hand to hand and found weapons, which are objects laying around that become unusual weapons.

SC:  Man of La Mancha’s The Impossible Dream in itself is epic.  So how did Americana decide to take on this show?

Jennifer Martin:  This is our third foray into musical theatre having taken on Grease and Lucky Stiff previously.  We try to choose stories that we believe matter, have great entertainment value, make our community better, and are ensemble driven.  Man of La Mancha is a storytelling, ensemble-driven show that works well with our company.  This show is great for that because Cervantes enters the prison and uses the prisoners to tell his story.

American Theatre Company Man of La Mancha

Scott Wahle as Don Quixote and Bethany Lauren James as Aldonza with Ruben Navarro as Sancho Panza

SC:  TV personality Scott Wahle stars as the Man of La Mancha.  He’s been in a few shows in the area such as Reagle Music Theatre of Greater Boston’s Guys and Dolls and Company Theatre’s Paragon Park.  He has a certain charisma and comic timing that fits Man of La Mancha.  How was the audition process?

JM:  We posted the audition on Backstage for our New York auditions and viewed about 500 audition videos for Aldonza, Sancho Panza, and Don Quixote (Cervantes).  After reviewing those videos, we traveled to New York and we did a full day of five minute audition slots.  We found Aldonza and Sancho Panza, but we still didn’t have our Man of La Mancha.  Americana’s President Peter Martin suggested his friend Scott Wahle.  Finding the Man of La Mancha was our actual quest and once we found him, everything fit into place.

SC:  What has been the show’s biggest challenge?

JM:  The first rehearsal process and making sure that above all, the words and richness of what was written is experienced by the audience while moving quickly.  The other challenge unique to our company is our four company members performing in the show are wearing multiple hats.  Managing Director David Friday plays The Governor and The Innkeeper while being the set builder and designer.  We’re doing a comedy, but sometimes it feels like a farce.

MK:  The concept we had settled upon affords an exploration of layers.  What I’m trying to communicate in this particular interpretation is even Cervantes does not completely understand the power of what he has written and it takes these prisoners and him watching how his story redeems them that truly brings home the power.

SC:  Man of La Mancha has something for everyone, but I think men will especially enjoy it.

MK:  It is a show with depth, substance, and great heart.  It also has some bite to it and aspects of it might be border line uncomfortable for people to experience.  I always think we can tell redemptive stories of girl scouts or in this particular instance, prostitutes.  The show makes a powerful statement by the end of this story.

Americana Theatre Company Man of La Mancha bow

The complete cast Photo credit to Denise Maccaferri

SC:  What’s been your favorite part of putting the show together?

MK:  I love to collaborate.  We had collaborative sessions on the telephone before we ever got here, just kicking around ideas then settling upon how we are to realize the conceptualization of the piece.  Then we start working with those people on a day to day basis bouncing ideas off each other, then trying things, and then trying them on the performers.  Theatre affords you what some more isolated performing arts don’t.  Theatre is created and performed in community.  Good ideas are great, and once it is on the stage, it’s not mine.  It’s ours.

SC:  The current season includes Man of La Mancha, Sleepy Hollow, and The Gifts of the Magi.  How do Americana select each season?

JM:  We look at what would be good for the town of Plymouth based on audience feedback of what they respond to, interested in, what they love, and what they are longing for.  We chose Man of La Mancha because we love the story, thought we could tell it well, and saw that it hasn’t been told for awhile in this area.

Our selection process takes about four months of thought and steady, hard work.  The Legend of Sleepy Hollow was chosen because we realize this area values holidays and traditional stories.  We thought of doing a one man version of Sleepy Hollow.  Our founding director Derek Martin is currently working on adapting the script and our Managing Director, David Friday, will be performing it.  We’re excited about performing an old, beautiful story in a simple, straight forward and creative manner.

The Gifts of the Magi is a lovely, six person musical so dear and true to the holiday season.  We wanted to tell a holiday story and keep the cast small in the wintertime because we want to perform it in the Center for the Arts, a small space.

SC:  Studio Americana youth program delves into a lot of big fantasy productions such as Peter Pan, Cinderella, The Wizard of Oz, and Alice in Wonderland.  I understand fall registration is still open.

JM:  Yes, registration is still open.  At Studio Americana, we work with each child individually which is why we keep the shows intentionally small so each student has an equal amount of time.  A lot of students say it’s the best part of their summer.

Studio Americana

Photo courtesy of Studio Americana

SC:  What do you envision the future of Americana Theatre Company?

JM:  We still are a bit of a secret in the South Shore.  We are blessed to have consistent five star reviews from people who come.  When people finally come, they say I can’t believe I’ve missed you guys.  We’re expanding our season with a cabaret and fundraiser in March, a show through July and have offerings in October. 

We’re a 501(c)3 company and have some great community sponsors.  As we get more support, we’d love to expand to a six show season where things are constantly happening.  People who come to Plymouth get the highest level of theatre across the United States, but we want our residents and guests to feel like this is also their hometown theater company.

Americana Theatre Company proudly presents Tony award-winning musical Man of La Mancha through July 29 at Spire Center for Performing Arts, 25 ½ Court Street in Plymouth, MA.  Click here for more information and tickets.  Click here for how to support Americana Theatre Company.  Follow Americana Theatre Company on Facebook and Twitter.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.