REVIEW: Chocolate promises and shattered dreams as Arlekin Players turn over a bizarre ‘Stone’

It is a show unlike anything the Sleepless Critic has ever seen before.  Arlekin Players is currently celebrating their 10th anniversary season as they present Marius von Mayenburg’s avant-garde production, ‘The Stone‘ (remount in English) through Sunday, September 29 in Needham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.    Click here for an interview done last year with director Igor Golyak.

Directed by Igor Golyak, ‘The Stone’ explores the history of a German house before and beyond World War II and its various owners which includes a Jewish family and their ancestors.  Quite a few revelations and family secrets are revealed through traumas and triumphs inside this haunting structure.

Arlekin Plays 'The Stone' with Viktoriya Kovalenko, Rimma Gluzman and Olga Sokolova

Viktoriya Kovalenko, Rimma Gluzman and Olga Sokolova in Arlekin Players ‘The Stone’ Photo courtesy of Irina Danilova/Arlekin Players

The Arlekin Players stage is an overwhelming experience told in the theatre round without a bad seat.  With vintage lighting by Jeff Adelberg,  ‘The Stone’ features very few props and unconventionally arranged set pieces which includes a partially buried piano, a vintage chandelier, and a chair hanging upside down from the ceiling.  As characters emerge and exit almost supernaturally from the floor in head-to toe-white with black paint splotches staining their pants, it quickly became clear that this would not be an orthodox production.

Arlekin Players 'The Stone'

Photo courtesy of Irina Danilova/Arlekin Players

With wild white hair, a pair of navigators called the conductors, portrayed with bizarre humor by Jenya Brodskaia and Misha Tyutyunik, are seemingly mad scientists that conduct and calculate time travel.  They take the audience through the history of the house before and beyond World War II, one of the most tumultuous times in history.  The time travel is a raging, jarring experience with special effects that may have been effective the first couple of times, but starts to distract from the tale as the show moves along.

The characters march strangely and unnaturally, sometimes under a plastic umbrella, an urgent tale with segments between the characters so brief, it is difficult to develop an attachment to them.  The cast is stoic for the most part, especially from Mieze, portrayed with a guarded, calculating air by Rimma Gluzman.  When Viktoriya Kovalenko as idealistic Heidrun discovers a small box in the house that she believes was her father’s, portrayed with complexity by David Gamarnik as Wolfgang, the moment Heidrun has with her mother Witha, portrayed by Darya Denisova, provides a touching moment in the production.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

I’m sure there is an audience for experimental theatre and the actual tale is powerful, but too unconventional and at times confusing for my taste.  It chooses to be different and complex when the story can be told in a straightforward way.  It is still art and it’s unforgettable.

Arlekin Players presents ‘The Stone’ through Sunday, September 29 at  368 Hillside Ave in Needham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets and here for more information on the Igor Golyak Acting Studio.

REVIEW: Beneath its potent calculations, Flat Earth Theatre’s ‘Delicate Particle Logic’ is a compelling love story

Flat Earth Theatre’s Delicate Particle Logic by Jennifer Blackmer pays an unforgettable visit into the complex mind of the wife of Noble Peace prize recipient and renowned German chemist Otto Hahn, artist Edith Hahn.  Multilayered in its telling with an interactive flair, this intriguing play takes a look back at three distinctive individuals that historically impacted the world during World War II, rooted in its intrinsic connection between art, science, logic, and love.

With sign language interpreters on scene on Oct 13, Flat Earth Theatre’s Delicate Particle Logic continues at the Black Box Theatre in the Mosesian Center for the Arts through Saturday, October 13.  The Mosesian Center for the Arts boasts free parking, general admission, and not a bad seat in Black Box’s half moon staging. Click here for more information and tickets.

Boasting recitations of the periodic table and a script with scientific verbiage that must have at times challenged this talented group, Delicate Particle Logic is a dark, emotional, thought-provoking, historical drama as renowned physicist and Otto Hahn’s work partner, Lise Meitner visits Edith Hahn as they recall their part in a significant era in World War II history.  With its share of surprising breakthroughs and revelations, it is a multilayered perspective on science, logic, art, and its driving force – love.

DPL - Otto, Edith, and Lise

From L to R: Thomas Grenon as Otto, Barbara Douglass as Edith and Christine Power as Lise Meitner Photo courtesy of Flat Earth Theatre

With blond braided hair and a voice rich in inquisitive charm, Barbara Douglass as uninspired, complicated artist Edith Hahn is the emotional core of the piece.  Douglass reveals her naiveté and warmth with a wide-eyed perspective as Lise and Edith recall the momentous events that ultimately lead to the Atom Bomb.  Edith’s bursts of creative energy tying into Christine A Banna’s Projection Design and PJ Strachman’s lighting design work well together to launch some exciting, yet haunting moments.  As passionate and she is moody, Douglass’s passionate performance as Edith is a particular highlight.

Christine Power exudes a veiled, cold practicality as physicist and Otto Hahn’s “work wife” Lise Meitner.  As serious as she is shrewd, Lise is at times determined beyond reason, but with an emotional attachment to her work that makes her willing to sacrifice everything for it.  With a tight bun secured in her hair and a simple dress, she rarely lets herself see beyond the next calculation.  As Edith observes, “Lise wants to give herself to science while men want to conquer it.”

DPL Lise and Otto

Christine Power as Lise and Thomas Grenon as Otto Hahn at work Photo courtesy of Flat Earth Theatre

In a full suit and tweed jacket, Thomas Grenon portrays serious and stern father of nuclear chemistry, Otto Hahn.  Grenon skillfully depicts Otto’s enigmatic personality under two contradicting perspectives as an unrelenting, meticulous perfectionist and a smitten, caring husband.

Portraying multiple roles from a scientist to a soldier to a nephew and a few between, chorus members Matt Arnold and Michael Lin slide into each of their roles with easy-to- follow, distinct subtlety.

Directed by Betsy S. Goldman, Delicate Particle Logic by Jennifer Blackmer continues at the Mosesian Center for the Arts, 321 Arsenal Street in Watertown, Massachusetts through Saturday, October 13.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Partially surrounded by a lush green lawn that gives it a campus feel, The Mosesian Center for the Arts houses a number of productions and exhibits during the year.  Offering free parking and set next to Panera Bread, current exhibitions include a Member Exhibition and Levon Parion Photographs.  The Improbable Players presents A Restaging of the End of the Line on October 17 for free.  Some other highlights include Watertown Children’s Theatre’s 35th Anniversary Celebration There’s No Place Like Home and Upstage Lung Cancer’s annual fundraiser, Barbra, Bette, and Bernadette hosted by Arts and Entertainment critic, Joyce Kulhawik.  Click here to see all that Mosesian Center for the Arts has to offer.

Director Igor Golyak discusses the shocking and comical show, ‘Dead Man’s Diary: A Theatrical Novel’

Taking a rich, multidimensional look at love and the theatre, the Arlekin Players proudly presents Mikhail Bulgakov’s Dead Man’s Diary: A Theatrical Novel for two weekends from Saturday, March 17 through Sunday, April 1 at Paramount Center in Boston, Massachusetts.  Shocking and comical, Dead Man’s Diary:  A Theatrical Novel is written in Russian and performed by Russian actors with English audio translation, but was created in Needham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Igor Golyak

Director Igor Golyak of ‘Dead Man’s Diary’ Photo courtesy of Igor Golyak Acting Studio

Dead Man’s Diary’s director and head of Igor Golyak Acting Studio, Igor Golyak, discusses this shocking and comical show’s fascinating background, developing the show’s unique style, and what it means to be successful.

Sleepless Critic:  What is it about this show that made you decide to take on this piece?

Igor Golyak:  I fell in love with the novel, a prose piece by Mikhail Bulgakov, which was not published until after his death as it was considered offensive to Stanislavsky and the Moscow Art Theatre. I wanted to adapt this unfinished novel for the stage because I saw it not only as satire on theatre, but as a vow of love to the theatre. Through this production, we wanted to express the conflicts and illusions around realizing oneself in the theatre through Bulgakov life’s work.

Arlekin Players Dead Mans Diary

‘Dead Man’s Diary: A Theatrical Novel’ Photo courtesy of the Arlekin Players

SC:  Arlekin Players is behind this production and they studied under the Igor Golyak Acting Studio.  Please tell me about your studio and teaching philosophy.  How can people join the Arlekin Players?

IG:  Right now, I mostly cast my students because we develop our own theatre vocabulary during the training period. This takes some time. It is a big advantage as I know the capabilities of the actors and how to challenge them. What’s most important in the theatre is the atmosphere of mutual respect and appreciation in the training and rehearsal process.  I aim to create this with the approach I take.  People can join the company by applying, coming to rehearsals, and possibly doing some scenes with company members.  Ultimately, if we mutually agree that the relationship can move forward, they join the company.  We have a family-type atmosphere in our theatre just like in life.  People get to know each other and some join the family.

SC:  This diary is written by a scorned lover.  How would you describe how the show depicts love or the lack thereof?

IG:  I am not sure if there is a better way to express the love for the theatre than through Bulgakov’s words.

The main character, Maksudov says:

‘I returned to the theater which had now become as necessary to me as morphine to an addict.” and “But more important was my love for the Independent Theatre; I was now pinned to it like a beetle to a piece of cork…’  

SC:  The show offers a new perspective on theatre and is at times shocking.  It also can be a bit haunting and bleak.  How did you develop the style of this show?

IG:  Each style of theatre for me is born out of the text, and the world of the author.

The main character says:

‘I started noticing that something colorful was emerging from the white pages.

The vision was not just a flat picture, but something three-dimensional.  As if peering into a little box, I could see the light gleaming and the figures from my novel moving about. Oh, what a fascinating game it was to observe these characters moving about the little room.’

Using this text, we decided to create a box that all the characters live in, and with them, Maksudov, the main character. What kind of box should it be?  Since the play depicts the Moscow Art Theatre in the 1920s, we decided that the shape of the walls of this box should depict the famous portrait foyer of the Moscow Art Theatre with portraits of the great artists of the time constantly staring at the author and characters inside the box.  We then decided that the audience members should portray these portraits, and thus, we have the audience seated around the box, in which characters come alive.  They are looking though their individual windows or portraits as if in a foyer of the legendary theatre.  Maksudov therefore, is forever stuck like Prometheus in the ‘magical box’ or the ‘portrait foyer’ that he loves more than anything in the world.

Arlekin Players Dead Man's Diary cast

A scene from Dead Man’s Diary: A Theatrical Novel Photo courtesy of Arlekin Players

SC:  This show also features its share of absurd comedy as well.

IG:  Correct.  In Maksudov’s eyes, the actors in the theatre hire him to write a play are from a different, exotic, and fascinating world.  It’s as if they are superhuman. The absurdity comes from the heightened level of passion of the characters and their incredible self-delusions, which at times are absurdly vulnerable and poetic, and at times absurdly cruel and self-absorbed. We recognize the faults of the human soul looking through Maskudov’s eyes as if though a looking glass, where the faults become exaggerated and ultimately comical.

SC:  It describes not only theatre, but the writer’s journey and touches upon what it really means to be successful.  What are your views on success?

IG:  My view of success is having a group of artists, a team of sorts, which is united and inspired by each other to produce a specific piece of text.  As a result, they are able to touch the souls of people in the audience.  When this happens, I feel truly successful.

SC:  What do you like most about this show and what is the best reason someone should attend?

IG:  I think the acting, directing, set design, music composition, and collaborative imagination all work together to give this piece an unusual style. We are excited to bring what we believe is a unique contribution to the Boston Theatre Scene. Also, the piece was written in Russian and is performed by Russian actors but was adapted and created here. We are a local company making new work for the last 9 years. We have already had 20 performances of Dead Man’s Diary. For those who have seen and loved it, it has grown even more over time.  See the show and you will not leave untouched.

Click here for more information and for tickets to Dead Man’s Diary: A Theatrical Novel from Saturday, March 17 through Sunday, April 1 at the Paramount Theatre in Boston, Massachusetts.  Follow the Arlekin Players on Facebook and Twitter.

Acrobat Nathan Knowles talks circus and inspiration as Celebrity Series of Boston presents award-winning show, Circa ‘S’

With sensational feats sure to cause the audience to look twice in amazement, the award-winning, animal free Australian circus, Circa is not only fun for the whole family, but has been enchanting audiences all over the world since 2004.  With a revamped cast making its third thrilling return to Boston, Celebrity Series of Boston proudly presents Circa ‘S’ for three performances only from Friday, March 2 through Sunday, March 4 with a post- performance artist talk on March 3 at Boch Center Shubert Theatre in Boston, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Joining the circus was a fire that burned the brightest for young Canadian acrobat, Nathan Knowles. Having been with Circa ‘S’ for 18 months, he learns something new and exciting every day.  Nathan talks about discovering the circus, what it takes to become an acrobat, and his future.

Circa - S - Image by Darcy-Grant6

Acrobats Photo courtesy of Darcy Grant

Sleepless Critic:  What first inspired you to become an acrobat and when did you decide it was your calling?

Nathan Knowles:  In my hometown of Maple Ridge, British Columbia, a clown first introduced me to the circus at age six during an extra-curricular program at my primary school. I went home from school that day and told my parents that one day I’ll be running away with the circus. They laughed it off thinking, ‘What kid doesn’t joke about that?’ I actually manifested it.

SC:  Was there something you wanted to be first, or was it always an acrobat?

NK:  As per a normal childhood, I had a few fleeting ideas of what I would do professionally one day, but the circus was always the fire that burned the brightest.

SC:  What kind of skills do you think it takes to become an acrobat?

NK:  It takes motivation, hunger, discipline, a healthy dose of insanity, and natural or developed physical talent.

Circa - S

Photo courtesy of Steve Eggelton

SC:  How did you get involved with Circa?

NK:  My involvement with Circa began at a workshop in Montréal with our Artistic Director, Yaron Lifschitz during my graduating year from National Circus School. A few months later, I had a signed contract and was hopping on a plane to Brisbane to start the adventure!

SC:  What is your favorite act to perform?

NK:  My acrobatic specialties are hand balancing and contortion, but in terms of the company’s repertoire, I’d have to say ‘Snap’. ‘Snap’ is a scene from our show Il Ritorno where the rest of the ensemble manipulates my body into seemingly impossible shapes and leaves me to sort myself out and bring my body back to normal.

SC:  Wow, that is wild.  Aside from excluding animals, in what way is Circa a unique experience?  I understand that ‘S’ stands for sinuous, seductive, sophisticated, sensual and savage.

Circa - S - Image by Steve-Eggelton6

Photo courtesy of Steve Eggelton

NK:  Circa, a show for all ages, is a stand out company based on our artistic approach to the simply physical and spectacular nature that circus is known for. The company is known for not only demonstrating extreme physical prowess but also our storytelling and capabilities to strike a nerve emotionally and reflectively in the souls of our audiences.

SC:  Circa has been established since 2004. How has this production evolved over the years?

NK:  Circa has grown immensely and has doubled, if not tripled in size. Our reputation for high quality work and innovation has been acclaimed and recognized in 36 different countries. We live up to our reputation without being elitist. We’re a group of fun loving, curious, and professional people from all walks of life.

SC:  What does Circa ‘S’ have in store for Boston? Does the act change a bit with each destination?

NK:  Boston is in for an exciting treat! Although ‘S’ has been performed in many venues around the world, it’s an almost completely revamped cast this time around, yet still holds true to the original concept and structure of the show.

SC:  What do you think makes Circa different from other circuses around the world?

NK:  What makes us different is our hunger and fearless drive to continue chipping away at the future of the circus. Our work is an honest extension of our own humanity, not simply physical prowess coated in fancy costuming, booming budgets, and heavy makeup.

Circa - S - Image by Justin-Nicholas1

Photo Courtesy of Justin Nicholas

SC:  I understand Circa also has a training center for young people from age 3 to 16. Please tell me more about that.

NK:  Circa Zoo, our training program, is an after school program for young people who either are looking for a fun way to stay active or develop the tools to one day break out into the professional market. They also do outreach and external projects in regional Australian towns.

SC:  What do you hope to accomplish with Circa in the future and in your career as an acrobat?

NK:  I prefer to view it as taking it one day at a time. I’ve worked for the company for 18 months now and there hasn’t been a day where I leave the studio or theatre without having learned something new. I’m unable to say at this point whether my career will extend to other companies apart from Circa. I’m happy where I am and have no intention of leaving any time soon. I am also highly interested in making my own work later in life, hopefully in the form of a solo show.

Circa - S -

Photo courtesy of Justin Nicholas

 

SC:  What is the best reason people should see Circa as it makes its third return to Boston with Celebrity Series?

NK:  We’ll have you on the edge of your seats, full to the brim with wonder and questioning!  We aim for you to walk away from the show with a sense of being changed or even a new flame of inspiration to take with you into your life.

Celebrity Series of Boston presents Circa ‘S’ from Friday, March 2 through Sunday, March 4 at Boch Center Shubert Theatre.  Click here for tickets and more about Celebrity Series of Boston as well as their upcoming events.  Follow them on Facebook and Twitter.

 

 

 

 

Queen Latifah, Ben Folds, ‘Jaws,’ and ‘E.T.’ part of the Boston Pops ‘Celebrating John Williams’ season

Sometimes the most tremendous talent is located right in the backyard.  Responsible for a wealth of critically-acclaimed and celebrated music scores over a career that spans six decades and beyond, Boston Pops Laureate conductor John Williams has been nominated for 50 Academy Awards, winning five.  Legendary film scores for Star Wars, Indiana Jones, Harry Potter, Jaws as well as the Olympic Fanfare and theme and NBC Sunday Night Football are just a glimpse of the spectacular works by the incomparable John Williams.

In honor of John’s 85th birthday and his incredible accomplishments over the years, The Boston Pops dedicate their season to Celebrating John Williams from Wednesday, May 10 through Saturday, June 17 at Boston Symphony Hall.  The season will kick off with multi-talented actress and singer Queen Latifah from Wednesday, May 10 to Thursday, May 11 and finishing off with the 25th anniversary of Gospel Night on Saturday, June 17.

Boston Pops Shot-04-281_RT2_Final

Queen Latifah opens the Boston Pops season Photo courtesy of Boston Pops

The Boston Pops also offers a pre-season concert series hosted by Indiana Jones star, Karen Allen and the live recording of Boston Pops CD release on Friday, April 7.  Click here for Boston Pops tickets and here for more information on upcoming BSO concerts.

Led by accomplished conductor Keith Lockhart, a compelling roster of renowned artists and celebrity appearances enliven this spring’s Boston Pops season.  The stage and screen have never been brighter with iconic artists such as musicians Ben Folds, Leslie Odom, Jr, and the Party with the B-52s.  Other highlights include The Beatles & Beyond, Jaws in Concert, Mamma Mia, E.T. in Concert, Cirque De la Symphonie,  Lights, Camera, Music, The Music of John Williams, and more.

Boston Pops Folds3

Ben Folds Photo courtesy of the Boston Pops

The Boston Pops presents the always phenomenal and wildly-popular Gospel Night once again led by Charles Floyd and the return of Film Night with John Williams.  Click here for a full list of performances.

Boston Pops 09_08_2016_LO1060750_xret (1)

Leslie Odom, Jr from Hamilton will perform with the Boston Pops Photo courtesy of the Boston Pops

Click here for tickets, call SymphonyCharge at 1-888-266-1200, or visit the Symphony Hall box office during business hours at 301 Massachusetts Ave in Boston, Massachusetts.  Follow The Boston Pops on Facebook and Twitter for updates.

 

REVIEW: South Shore Conservatory presents fascinating art exhibition, ‘South Shore Photographers’ through April 30

No matter how talented an artist is, there is nothing like discovery and opportunity.  South Shore Conservatory is dedicated to mold and provide opportunity for promising talent in the arts through their classes, workshops, and exhibits.  Click here for further insight into the South Shore Conservatory with two locations in Hingham and Duxbury, Massachusetts.

Curated by Judith Montminy, South Shore Conservatory and South Shore Art Center offered an opening reception for an insightful exhibition featuring 44 South Shore Photographers’ inspirational works of art on Thursday, March 23 at 6 p.m.  Visit South Shore Photographers exhibit through Sunday, April 30 at South Shore Art Center.

SS Conservatory Opening Reception and exhibition

‘South Shore Photographers’ feature 44 artists on two floors Photo courtesy of South Shore Art Center

Linked by a regal wooden staircase, The South Shore Art Center is brimming with carefully selected framed pieces on two floors.  Delicious free food and wine were available for guests at the reception as they carefully perused bright colors and abstract pieces.  Other pieces portrayed water and people.

SS Conservatory Art Gallery 2

Part of the exhibit for ‘South Shore Photographers’ Photo courtesy of Michelle McGrath

Soft landscapes, bright, sparkling water, snow steeped winter scenes, colorful highways, emerald green wooded views, and a pair of Bengal tigers is just a taste of what these deeply observant photographers offer in this ongoing exhibition.  Convinced that one portrait will be a perfect fit to take home?  Each framed photo is on sale.

Keri McAndrews Trees in Fog at exhibition

Guests gather at ‘South Shore Photographers’ opening reception and ponder ‘Trees in Fog’ by Keri McAndrews Photo courtesy of Keri McAndrews

South Shore Art Center presents South Shore Photographers exhibition through Sunday, April 30 at South Shore Conservatory, One Conservatory Drive in Hingham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information, how to donate, and the full calendar of upcoming events.  Follow South Shore Art Center on Facebook.

Urban Improv, celebrating its 25th anniversary, presents annual, celebrity-filled improv fundraiser, ‘Banned in Boston’

Urban Improv is celebrating its 25th anniversary and presenting their annual fundraiser, Banned in Boston, an evening of delicious food from top restaurants, celebrity improv, and much more on Friday, April 7 at House of Blues in Boston, Massachusetts at 6 p.m.  This is a 21+ event.

134549_BIB_Invite

Photo courtesy of Urban Improv

Hosted by Jim Braude and Margery Eagan, this year’s celebrity roster is once again brimming with acclaimed faces in entertainment such as WGBH’s Jared Bowen and Emily Rooney, Matt Siegel from Kiss 108, WCVB’s JC Monahan, Tom Hamilton from Aerosmith, and musician Sally Taylor.  Political leaders such as Governor Charlie Baker and Mayor Marty Walsh, arts and educational leaders will be present such as Matthew Teitelbaum of Museum of Fine Arts and Anita WalkerMassachusetts Cultural CouncilEnjoy delicious food from a wide array of restaurants such as Mei Mei, Roxy’s Grilled Cheese, East Coast Grill, Eastern Standard, and Area FourClick here for the full guest list, ticket information, and more.

Cissa Campion, Marketing Director of Urban Improv, offers a closer look at Urban Improv, its mission, and why their annual musical revue Banned in Boston is the funniest fundraiser of the year.

Jeanne Denizard:  The annual Banned in Boston fundraiser provides educational workshops guiding youth on how to best deal with tough, real life situations such as racism, violence, and bullying.  Please tell me more about the workshops.

Cissa Campion:  Banned in Boston is Urban Improv’s only annual fundraiser.  Urban Improv’s highly effective, interactive drama programs help young people explore challenging situations in their lives. We work with kids from 4th grade through high school. Whether it is peer pressure, cyber bullying, racism, homophobia, or violence, students role-play scenarios based on their own choices and experience the consequences of their actions in a safe environment.

Our atmosphere of openness and respect allows students to express themselves, leading to stronger self-esteem and improved conflict resolution, cooperation, and leadership skills.  Urban Improv helps students grapple with issues they face every day and equips them with the skills they need to become leaders who communicate our messages of nonviolence, tolerance, and respect. We call it “A Rehearsal for Life.”

Urban Improv has presented to thousands of students at schools and community groups throughout Boston, New England, and beyond.  It has been able to provide thousands of free workshops to Boston schools since its inception in 1992, 25 years ago.

JD:  What would you say is the best reason one should attend Banned in Boston?

CC:  Come for the laughs and because it’s such a good time. It’s a one-night-only event on Friday, April 7. We have this incredible roster of celebrities under one roof and all bets are off!  No rubber chicken and boring speeches at this fundraiser and enjoy delectable food provided by the city’s top restaurants.  Support a great cause that is having a powerful effect in this city.

Click here for more information and tickets to this hilarious, one night only event starting at Lansdowne Pub for a cocktail reception at 9 Lansdowne Street at 6 p.m.  Banned in Boston musical revue at House of Blues, 15 Lansdowne Street kicks off at 7:45 p.m.

Urban Improv is located at 670 Centre Street in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information on Urban Improv, its upcoming events, and how to support this dynamic organization.

REVIEW: Boston Ballet presents William Forsythe’s brilliantly compelling ‘Artifact’

World-renowned choreographer William Forsythe, dressed in a baseball cap and modest attire, addressed an eager, mesmerized audience in a post-show talk with Boston Ballet’s acclaimed Artistic Director Mikko Nissinen after the evening performance of William Forsythe’s Artifact on Saturday, March 25.  Mikko Nissinen introduced Forsythe with enthusiasm and said that working with him has been a lifelong dream fulfilled.  William Forsythe and Boston Ballet’s Artistic Director Mikko Nissinen have a five-year partnership, working together to establish each season’s performances, highlighting one of Forsythe’s exceptional works each year.

01_Part IV

The Boston Ballet Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor/Boston Ballet

Friendly and unassuming, Forsythe spoke about his beautifully-unconventional production, Artifact, a piece he created over 30 years ago and a work that audiences and critics alike have embraced ever since.  Veiled on the Boston Opera House stage and enhanced with minimal props, lies a complex, timeless, and thought-provoking masterpiece which makes a powerful statement on the essence of the art of ballet.  Shown in its full length, Forsythe revised Artifact’s finale specifically for the Boston Ballet, which is a thrilling, compelling spectacle that blends classical and contemporary dance in a unique way.

07_Part IV

Boston Ballet presents ‘Artifact’ Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor/Boston Ballet

Boston Ballet presents William Forsythe’s Artifact through Sunday, March 5 at the Boston Opera House.  Click here for tickets, call 617-695-6955, or visit the Boston Ballet box office at 19 Clarendon Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Take a closer look at William Forsythe’s Artifact here.

Blending humor, philosophy, drama, and a wide range of traditional and contemporary ballet, William Forsythe’s Artifact, since the show was introduced, set a significant precedent in the inspiring works that followed.  A production packed with a wide range of welcome surprises, each distinct character offers their own insight into this mysterious tale.  Featuring a shimmering backdrop that matched the majestic, glittering black gown worn by Dana Caspersen, a statuesque woman in grey portrayed by Caralin Curcio, and a dapper, yet frustrated older man with megaphone portrayed by Nicholas Champion, Artifact is an intensely fascinating work from its start.

01_Part IV

Raina Sawai as Woman in Gray and Nicholas Champion as Man with Megaphone

Caspersen’s performance is  full of jubilance and inquisitiveness from the moment she welcomed the audience with a peerless smile.  Curcio delivers a haunting, athletic, and captivating non-verbal performance, her movements sharp, poised, and vigorous while she appears in unexpected places.  Dignified and authoritative, Champion’s dynamic performance boasts comedic moments, especially in his interaction with Caspersen.  While Champion’s musings are incomprehensible and muffled, Caspersen’s seem philosophical and poetic.

Artifact, divided into four parts like a symphony, features piano by Margot Kazimirska and delves into a full range of emotions as the piano seems to have a mind of its own, often breaking convention.  The music, featuring J.S. Boch: Chaconne from Partita Nr. 2 BWV 1004 in D-Minor by Nathan Milstein, Sound Collage by William Forsythe, and music from composer and pianist Eva Crossman-Hecht, progresses from playful to somber then frantic to rhythmic.

02_Part II

Sao Hye Han and Paul Craig in William Forsythe’s ‘Artifact’ Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor

Dressed in rich, vibrant color and launching into choreography ranging from romantic and sweeping to freestyle to stiff and regimented, the Boston Ballet often break convention under the direction of Curcio.  A few of the highlights are ballet dancers breaking away into romantic, sweeping duets as they spin, sway, and soar.  With a verbal countdown, they perform intrinsic dance combinations such as a row of dancers drop to the floor in unison, embracing.  Another thrilling highlight is the ballet directs the curtain to lift and close, creating snapshots of various, choreographed scenes.  As Artifact culminates into an unpredictable, uplifting, and magnificent finale, unified dancers are as mesmerizing as the dancers breaking away into frantic, dynamic arrangements, performing pirouettes to a wild rhythm, blossoming into a new entity.

01_Part IV

Seo Hye Han and the Boston Ballet in ‘Artifact’ Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor/Boston Ballet

Click here for tickets, call 617-695-6955, or visit the Boston Ballet box office at 19 Clarendon Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Subscriptions and group rates are also available. Follow the Boston Ballet on Twitter.

The Boston Ballet’s 2017-18 season boasts masterful works such as Kylian/Wings of Wax from March 23 through April 2, Robbins/The Concert from May 5 through May 27, Obsidian Tear from November 3 through November 12, and the return of Tchaikovsky’s beloved holiday classic, Mikko Nissinen’s The Nutcracker from November 24 through December 31, 2017.  Click here for a closer look at all of Boston Ballet’s 2017-18 season highlights.