REVIEW: Versatile singer Joyce Didonato performed classics with a compelling twist as Celebrity Series presented ‘Songplay’

It is easy to see why mezzo soprano Joyce Didonato has such a following on social media and otherwise.  For one night only, she took the stage to share what she has learned from music and more as Celebrity Series presented Songplay on Friday, March 1 at New England Conservatory’s Jordan Hall at 8 p.m.  Click here for more information and here for where Joyce Didonato will appear next.

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Celebrity Series of Boston presented Joyce Didonato for one night only on March 1 Photo courtesy of Celebrity Series

Celebrity Series has a knack for welcoming artists that not only show off their talent, but teach the audience a thing or two about their craft, leaving the audience some material to ponder.  With a lively, charming presence and a versatile voice that defies a definitive genre, mezzo-soprano Joyce Didonato shattered a few traditions and came up with a refreshing repertoire that combined opera, jazz, baroque, and other genres making a few classic songs new again.

Emerging from backstage in a shimmering emerald evening gown, this dynamic singer was greeted by a full house.  This particular show seemed to be tailor-made for professionally-trained singers as Joyce shared details of her extensive vocal training, recalling in jest and self deprecation the tools that helped her become the professional singer she is.  She also shared some personal reflections and comical stories between songs about her life and music.

With soaring, soothing vocals and an impeccable range, Joyce’s voice is as sophisticated with an aria as it is playful with jazz and Broadway numbers.  Fans of opera and jazz would especially enjoy the show, but Joyce and her band offered enough variety and humor with each transformed song that most music fans could appreciate it as well.

Celebrity Series Joyce Didonato Robert Torres

Throughout the evening, she introduced her acclaimed band one by one with anecdotes and playful music interludes.  Each band member had their individual chance to shine.  Behind a large Steinway and Sons grand piano sat pianist and arranger Craig Terry with whom she shared more than a few lighthearted moments with.  They kicked off the evening with the Italian aria, Caro mio ben and later Craig performed a captivating rendition of Dizzy Fingers.

Hailing from Buenos Aires, Lautaro Greco introduced the bandoneon, a unique instrument which is played like a piano, shaped like an accordion, but sounds like a horn.  He joined her lively band that included revered double bassist Chuck Isreals, acclaimed percussionist Jimmy Madison, and legendary trumpet player Charlie Porter.  The band’s random, surprising music notes added a few humorous and cheeky moments to the performance, the horn chasing her soaring vocals during a jazz-infused interlude.  All in good fun.

A few of the evening’s highlights included a heartfelt, angst-ridden rendition of Will He Like Me?  from the Broadway show, She Loves Me, a tender, reflective rendition of Gene Scheer’s Lean Away dedicated to Andre Previn, Duke Ellington’s classic Solitude, and a song Joyce always dreamed of singing, Edith Piaf’s La Vie en Rose.

At one point during the show, Joyce referred to playing traditional music just one way as an emotional straight jacket.  Watching her put a creative spin on these classics with humor, grace, and gusto was a liberating experience.

Celebrity Series of Boston offers a dynamic roster featuring the annual Stave SessionsAlvin Ailey American Dance Theatre, Shawn Colvin, and much more.  Click here for more information and for tickets. Tickets can also be obtained at the Celebrity Series of Boston’s box office.  Follow Celebrity Series of Boston on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REVIEW: Avarice and deceit rule the day as Lyric Stage Company presents Lillian Hellman’s riveting ‘The Little Foxes’

They hunt, fight, and are particularly clever.  Foxes stalk their prey and can strike from dusk till dawn.  Once they pounce, they leave ruin in their wake.

Lillian Hellman’s powerful play, The Little Foxes recently celebrated its 80th anniversary opening on Broadway and the 90th anniversary since the play was first published.  After seeing this production for the first time at the Lyric Stage Company, there is no question why this show possesses such longevity.  It’s an intense, intriguing drama where power is paramount and, given the right players as was done here, never a dull moment.

Directed by award-winning director Scott Edmiston, The Lyric Stage Company of Boston presents Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes through Sunday, March 17 at 140 Clarendon Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  The show is told in three riveting acts.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

The Little Foxes

Lyric Stage Company of Boston presents ‘The Little Foxes’ through March 17 Photo courtesy of The Lyric Stage Company

Taking place during the post-Civil War era at the turn of the century, The Little Foxes depicts a Southern family of means who are never satisfied.  They intend to strike a lucrative deal with Bill Mootos as affluent and distinguished William Marshall, a man who may hold the key to a big payoff.  However, can this family work together or is it every man for himself?

An ornate, brass chandelier, a grand staircase, and detailed glass doors are a just a few of the opulent features of Janie E. Howland’s exquisite set design.  Gail Astrid Buckley’s enthralling costume design boasts ladies adorned in elegant, detailed gowns faithful to the era as gentlemen dress to the nines in coat and tails.  Karen Perlow’s dramatic lighting combined with Scott Emiston’s skillful direction produce a simmering intensity while augmenting the show’s poignant moments.

The Little Foxes Cast

From L to R: Remo Airaldi as Ben, Michael John Ciszewski as Leo, Bill Mootos as William Marshall, Kinson Theodoris as Cal, Anne Gottlieb as Regina, Cheryl D. Singleton as Addie, Rosa Procaccino as Alexandra, and Amelia Broome as Birdie Photo courtesy of Lyric Stage Company

The Little Foxes features a stellar cast, headlined by Anne Gottlieb as sophisticated and aptly named Regina Giddens.  Her charm and shrewdness could give Scarlett O’Hara a run for her money.  Gottlieb’s visibly charming demeanor hides a smoldering callousness, a woman who will sacrifice anything for what she wants.  Her shifty eyes and perfect red lips wind in a smile as she calculates her next move.  Her astonishing scenes with Craig Mathers as wise, ailing Horace Giddens alone is worth the price of admission.

Amelia Broome delivers a moving performance as aristocrat Birdie Hubbard.  Flanked in pearls and ethereal, flowing gowns, Broome, her face taut and wide-eyed, depicts Birdie’s palpable anxiety, a compassionate soul who has seen too much and longs for the past.  She shares a sweet camaraderie with Rosa Procaccino as naïve Alexandra Giddens who Birdie sees so much of herself in her while Birdie’s encounters with Will McGarrahan as Oscar, her unpredictable husband, are gripping.

The Little Foxes Horace and Birdie

From L to R: Remo Airaldi as Ben, Michael John Ciszewski as Leo, Will McGarrahan as Oscar, Amelia Broome as Birdie, Craig Mathers as Horace, and Anne Gottlieb as Regina Photo courtesy of Lyric Stage Company

With a gleeful, audacious laugh, Remo Airaldi delivers a memorable, complex performance as Benjamin Hubbard.  His careful balance between humor and deceit make him intriguing, interacting with each character with ever-changing faces.

After portraying a swaggering, conceited Smee in Hub Theatre Company of Boston’s Peter and the Starcatcher last year, Michael Jon Ciszewski brings his quite fittingly scene-chewing charisma to the smarmy Leo Hubbard.  Cheryl D. Singleton as all-knowing Addie and Kinson Theodoris as Cal are wonderful, delivering some of the show’s most insightful and humorous moments.

What makes The Little Foxes such a fascinating work in the 90 years and counting since it was first presented onstage is its universal truths.  When is enough enough?  In a world of double crosses and scheming to get the lion’s share, when it is enough to be grateful for what you already have?  I guess for some families, the thrill is in the chase.

The Lyric Stage Company continues Lillian Hellman’s The Little Foxes through Sunday, February 3 at 140 Clarendon Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Click here for tickets and more information.  Subscriptions and dinner packages are also available.  Follow The Lyric Stage on Twitter and Facebook for their upcoming productions and more.

Renowned Broadway producer Ken Davenport talks Tony Awards, Hollywood, and ‘Gettin’ the Band Back Together’

Ambitious Tony award-winning Broadway and off-Broadway theatre producer and writer Ken Davenport has had a passion for theatre his entire life.  He has produced renowned musicals from Godspell to Kinky Boots to this year’s Tony-nominated Once on This Island and helms the North American activity for Andrew Lloyd Webber’s Really Useful Group.  Dedicated to bridge the gap between the stage and its audience, he is also behind an interactive theatre app, Didhelikeit as well as the hit board game, Be a Broadway Star.

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Ken Davenport Photo courtesy of Ken Davenport

Ken talked to Sleepless Critic about when he first discovered the theatre, Hollywood and the Tony Awards, and his upcoming musical comedy, Gettin’ the Band Back Together.  Click here for more on Ken Davenport and see who the the big winners are on the 72nd annual Tony Awards on Sunday June 10.

The 72nd Annual Tony Awards hosts

Hosts Josh Groban and Sara Bareilles Photo credit: Cliff_Lipson-CBS

Sleepless Critic:  What awakened your interest in theatre and how did the opportunity to become a Broadway producer come about?

Ken Davenport:  My mom told me I first kicked when she was watching a production of Godspell, so I think I’ve always wanted to be part of the theatre.  I produced the first revival of Godspell on Broadway in 2011.

Being a producer is like starting your own business.  Opportunities don’t come about.  You have to make them happen.

SC:  What do you like most about producing and what production did you find to be the most challenging?

KD:  I love watching the audience’s expressions on their faces at the end of the show whether they are laughing, crying, or cheering.  We’ve affected them and that’s a joy to watch.

The most challenging part of producing is getting everyone on the same page.  It’s like getting ten people to paint the Mona Lisa.

SC:  Is there a show you turned down that you ended up wishing you were a part of?

KD:  Nah, I have no regrets.  I’ve passed on shows that have gone on to be hits, but they weren’t me.  They still wouldn’t be me, even if I had a few more bucks in my pocket.  I’d much rather stay true to what I want to do.

SC:  The musical, Mean Girls is one of the big Tony nominees this year and it is one of many Hollywood to Broadway musical crossovers.  From Pretty Woman to Heathers, do you think that this method has been an effective way to draw a wider audience to Broadway?  From what I’ve seen of Mean Girls and having recently seen Waitress, it seems to be working well.

KD:  Movies have become a common source for adaptations in the last ten years, but it doesn’t guarantee success.  I think the adaptations that work best are the ones that don’t have super popular source material.  It’s like when a movie is made from a book.  Most people think the book is better.  That happens a lot when popular movies are made into musicals.  It’s a very high hurdle to jump over.

SC:  What has been your favorite Hollywood to Broadway crossover musical so far?

KD:  Kinky Boots because I am one of the producers.

SC:  From classic musicals like Rogers and Hammerstein’s Carousel to Spongebob Squarepants, what nominations most surprised you and which did you think should have been nominated?

KD:  I think my choreographer from Once on this Island, Camille A. Brown should have been nominated as well as Alex Newell.

SC:  Which do you predict will be the standout production to win?  I’m sure you were thrilled when Once on This Island was nominated, a show you have produced.

KD:  I think the awards this year will be spread out amongst several shows rather than one big winner taking home multiple awards.

SC:  You work to make Broadway a more interactive experience.  Please tell me about the apps you promote.

KD:  We have an app for our website, Didhelikeit.com that gives you a snapshot of show reviews and focuses on the New York Times.

Gettin the Band Back Together

‘Gettin’ the Band Back Together’ premieres on July 19.

SC:  Just a few of the productions you have worked on is Groundhog DaySpring Awakening, and The Play That Goes Wrong.  The musical comedy, Getting the Band Back Together is coming up.

KD:  I’m super excited about Gettin’ the Band Back Together, which starts performances on July 19.  It’s such a fun show to be a part of and totally original.  It has an original story, music, etc.  It’s going to be a blast so come see it!

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Click here for more information on Ken Davenport and here for more on Ken’s current project, Gettin’ the Band Back Together.  Hosted by Josh Groban and Sara Bareilles, find out who wins on CBS for the 72nd annual Tony Awards on Sunday June 10 at 8 p.m.  Follow The Tony Awards on Facebook.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

Acclaimed producer Sue Gilad talks Tony nominations, girl power, and heartwarming musical, ‘A Taste of Things to Come’

From the award-winning Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812 to Angels in America, renowned theatre producer Suzanne Gilad has an eye for the next big show.  Boasting an array of memorable tunes, Sue’s current musical project, A Taste of Things to Come, has been described as Jersey Boys meets Betty Crocker meets the 60s feminist movement.  It takes the stage at Chicago’s Broadway Playhouse through April 29.

A Taste of Things to Come poster

Photo courtesy of Broadway in Chicago

Sue discusses getting Tony nominations, bringing A Taste of Things to Come to Chicago, and Turtle Wax.  Click here for more information and tickets to A Taste of Things to Come.

Sleepless Critic:  You are involved in a number of well known projects such as Angels in America, Madame Butterfly, Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812, and upcoming project, The Other Josh Cohen.  What first brought you into the theatre world?

Sue Gilad:  I was a performer a long time ago and then started doing voice overs, which took me down a completely separate and fun path.  A few years ago, a friend created a show and asked me if I would help shape it.  I discovered being a producer meant that I could be responsible and still have a life. We get to be creative in terms of what kinds of work we bring to the public to see and hopefully open their minds and hearts.  It made sense and there are still relatively few female producers in the business, although that is changing.  There is a lot of growth for that.

I would jump Broadway projects as a co-producer and that is what is happening with the recently opened Angels in America.  People ask me if they can meet Andrew Garfield who delivers a tremendous and transformative performance in the show.  I’ve never seen him like that.

SC:  What was it like for you when Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812 got multiple Tony nominations?

SG:  It was such a big honor that the show received the most Tony nominations of any show last year.  The best part about getting the nominations was The Great Comet was a big creative risk.  I don’t think anyone thought it was going to be on Broadway with its tiny stage and cast.  When it was at the American Repertory Theatre (A.R.T) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, Diane Paulus wanted to take the show which was in the round and remount it into proscenium theatre.  She did to great acclaim and it became an immersive production, unlike anything Broadway has ever seen before.

A Taste of Things to Come women

Libby Servais (Broadway: Wicked, Lysistrata Jones), Cortney Wolfson (Broadway: The Addams Family, Les Miserables) Broadway’s Linedy Genao (On Your Feet! Original Broadway Cast), Marissa Rosen (Off-Broadway’s The Marvelous Wonderettes) Photo courtesy of Broadway in Chicago

 

SC:  A Taste of Things to Come has an all female crew.  Was it planned that way?

SG:  Dare I say that the women were the most qualified for the job?  A Taste of Things to Come, written by Hollye Levin and Debra Barsha, is based on Hollye’s experience of her mom and a part of it tells the story of the life her mom had growing up.  Then director Lorin Latarro came onboard when the show debuted at Bucks County Playhouse in Pennsylvania.  Everybody loved her and she brings tremendous things to the show.

The show features four women that age from age 25 in 1957 to age 35 in 1967.  Everything blows open in the beginning of Act 2 when they are 10 years older and wiser with more opportunities for women and delicious secrets about race, religion, and sexuality which is not something you really talked about in the 1950s.  By the 1960s, there was a real space for it.  You get to see these women’s journeys during an incredible moment in history.

SC:  What was it about A Taste of Things to Come that grabbed your attention?

SG:  I saw a rehearsal or reading of this show and loved it.  It gave me the opportunity to articulate my gratitude to the generation before me that broke through so many glass ceilings I didn’t even know existed.

Women of that generation either didn’t work or they became teachers and nurses so my generation can become doctors and superintendents.  Then my kids’ generation can do whatever they want for work or nothing for work.  It’s just extraordinary and gave me a window into the past.  I can share it with my mom and, if I wanted to, bring my teenage daughters to it.  It’s a celebration of friendship, solidarity, and kind of interestingly timed with the advent of the ‘me too’ and ‘times up’ movement that women in their time also had to take a stance for things that were beyond their comfort zone or what was socially acceptable at the time.

A Taste of Things to Come cast

The cast of ‘A Taste of Things to Come’ Photo courtesy of Broadway in Chicago

SC:  The New York Times has described A Taste of Things to Come as ‘a recipe for catchy musical theatre.’  Please tell me a little about the music and your favorite songs.

SG:  Composer Debra Barsha worked on Jersey Boys on Broadway for ten years so it starts out with the popular tunes of the 1950s.  Ten years later, things become a lot groovier and it had a really distinctive 60s sound.  My favorite song has been shifting as I get to know it better, but today I love the song, Blessings in Disguise.  It’s a testament to the things we think will challenge us which are actually the things that make us stronger and give us unexpected gifts.  My other favorite song is In Time, the final song of the show.  The entire cast sings it and they look back at what they have been through together as individuals and as a group of friends.  The best things happen in time.

SC:  What has it been like putting the show together?

Since the show is set in Winnetka, A Taste of Things to Come is making its home in Chicago.  It’s been fun listening to the audio discs during previews because of the way the audience giggles with any Winnetka or Chicago reference.  We were very lucky to get New York Broadway actresses but we also have an understudy that can swing all four roles.  Madison Kauffman is a Chicago native who just graduated from college.  She came in for the first day of rehearsal completely off book for all four roles.  Her level of excitement and passion is so thrilling.

A Taste of Things to Come Chicago cast

The cast of ‘A Taste of Things to Come’ Photo courtesy of Broadway in Chicago

SC:  What kind of support is the show looking for?

SG:  We have a great sponsor based out of Chicago called Turtle Wax.  It is in the script because it was wax that men were using in 1957 for their cars.  We would be open for Chicago-based companies to sponsor the show because we do have a wonderful, primarily female, well-educated audience.

SC:  What is in store for the future of the show?

SG:  We have wonderful theatres interested in having the show at their theatre so we might take the show on tour.  Then we’re hoping to get it licensed so every school, regional theatre, community, and worldwide theatre can perform it and share the victories of womanhood.

A Taste of Things to Come continues at the Broadway Playhouse in Chicago through April 29.  Click here for more information and for tickets.  Follow A Taste of Things to Come on Facebook and Twitter.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

 

REVIEW: NPR’s Rob Kapilow’s engaging ‘What Makes It Great? The Songs of Leonard Bernstein’ hit all the right notes

NPR’s famous composer, conductor, and music commentator Rob Kapilow certainly knows his way around a baby grand piano.  Under soft lights and in front of a full house, he is once again ready to transform the way the audience hears and understands some classic tunes.

In honor of the legendary composer and playwright Leonard Bernstein and the centennial of his birth, Rob Kapilow took his popular, 22nd annual What Makes It Great series to Harvard University’s Sanders Theatre, which is Bernstein’s alma mater on Friday, March 9 for one night only.  Celebrity Series of Boston presented What Makes it Great? with Rob Kapilow and Jessica Rivera:  The Songs of Leonard Bernstein featuring an array of legendary Broadway songs during Leonard Bernstein’s time, delving into its brilliant, emotional quality and style through its carefully selected musical notes. Part teacher, humorist, and historian, Rob Kapilow proved once again that this engaging series is as fascinating as ever.  Click here for more on What Makes it Great and here for more on Celebrity Series of Boston.

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Renowned soprano Jessica Rivera Photo courtesy of Celebrity Series of Boston

Calling on a few of Broadway’s most enchanting and classic love songs, Rob was accompanied by renowned soprano Jessica Rivera.  Adorned in a shimmering black dress, Jessica’s versatile, impressive vocals ranged from lighthearted to passionate yearning as Rob had Jessica peel back the layers of each song, revealing what makes each tune shine.  With humor and grace, Rob and Jessica also revealed what each song might have sounded like without its individuality.  What Makes It Great never fails as an eye-opening experience.

Delving into the musical atmosphere and history of Leonard Bernstein’s time, Rob chose a selection of powerful, yet dreamy classic Broadway songs reflective of this era while showing how they are also vastly ahead of their time.  From dreamy songs such as, A Little Bit in Love from Bernstein’s Wonderful Town to the high-spirited I Could Have Danced All Night from Lerner and Loewe’s My Fair Lady to the powerful Somewhere from Bernstein’s West Side Story, Rob shows how the composer ties the musical elements together to enhance the listener’s musical experience.  For example, he describes how Leonard Bernstein’s wildly successful West Side Story is a perfect fusion of classical technique to popular theatre.

Evan Kinnane, a renowned Boston tenor, joined Rob and Jessica for a special stage performance of Tonight after Rob described what makes this song so special.  Full of passion and excitement, Evan and Jessica have a mesmerizing rapport and their marvelous blend of vocals demonstrates the song’s and Bernstein’s timeless appeal.

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NPR’s Rob Kapilow and his piano Photo courtesy of Celebrity Series of Boston

After 22 years, Rob Kapilow continues to captivate audiences with his vast musical knowledge, sense of humor, and his careful analysis of what makes music such a rich, fulfilling experience.  Capping off the evening, Jessica Rivera poignantly sang Some Other Time from the Leonard Bernstein’s musical, On the Town, about how quickly time passes by.  It’s a fond farewell until next time.

Celebrity Series of Boston continues its stellar season with the 50th Anniversary of Alvin Ailey Dance Theatre, acclaimed soprano and Broadway star Audra McDonald, Ira Glass, Los Angeles Philharmonic, and much more.  Click here for more information and for tickets. Tickets can also be obtained at the Celebrity Series of Boston’s box office.  Follow Celebrity Series of Boston on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

REVIEW: Lexus Broadway in Boston’s ‘Waitress the Musical’ proves the best things in life come from the kitchen

Lexus Broadway in Boston’s heartwarming and meaningful musical, Waitress the Musical, shows that life’s most important answers can be found in a pie.  Currently on a national tour, Waitress, with book by Jessie Nelson, music and lyrics by Tony and Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Sara Bareilles and featuring an all female production team, oozes with southern charm as baker Jenna, portrayed passionately by Desi Oakley, finds herself pregnant and falling in love with her doctor.

Jenna in the kitchen

Desi Oakley as Jenna in the national tour of Waitress, photo by Joan Marcus and courtesy of Broadway in Boston

With a cast of colorful and comical characters and based on the 2007 film of the same name starring Keri Russell, Waitress served its best in Boston from February 20 through March 4 at the Boston Opera House.  Click here to see where Waitress will be taking the stage next and here for more on Lexus Broadway in Boston.

From a bright neon sign and red chrome booths to clever choreography that gives diner dancing a fresh, new meaning, the majority of Waitress is set inside the vintage and picturesque Joe’s Pie Diner.  Impressive songs range from catchy to reflective and numbers like When He Sees Me and Opening Up are sure to stay with the audience long after the show is over.

Full of heart, what Waitress the Musical achieves is a delicate balance of the sweetness and realism of life, delving into the lives of a group of dynamic characters who dream of a better life.  Jenna expresses her thoughts on life through the humorous titles she deems to Joe’s Diner Pie of the Day.

'Waitress the Musical 'Jenna and Earl

Nick Bailey & Desi Oakley in the national tour of Waitress, photo by Joan Marcus and Matthew Murphy and courtesy of Broadway in Boston

Desi Oakley delivers a powerful, inspiring performance as Jenna.  She depicts Jenna’s complex web of emotions with a blend of dark humor and a note of hope.  Her voice is as versatile as the pies she bakes and her intense rendition of She Used to Be Mine is one of the show’s greatest highlights.  Her irresistible chemistry and beautiful harmony with compassionate and mysterious Bryan Fenkart as Dr. Pomatter are engaging in the playful Bad Idea and the tender You Matter to Me.  Dressed in a plaid shirt, worn jeans, and tied back hair, Nick Bailey as Earl is manipulative and gruff with a rich, rock n roll voice.

'Waitress the Musical' Doctor visit

Maiesha McQueen, Desi Oakley & Bryan Fenkart in the national tour of Waitress, photo by Joan Marcus and Matthew Murphy and courtesy of Broadway in Boston

With big earrings and wild hair, Charity Angel Dawson offers a great deal of comic relief as outspoken and wise cracking waitress Becky.  Passionate and direct, Becky is captivating in the number, I Didn’t Plan It and her onstage charisma will have the audience hanging on her every word.

Waitress The magic of pie

Charity Angel Dawson, Desi Oakley & Lenne Klingaman in the national tour of Waitress, photo by Joan Marcus and Matthew Murphy and courtesy of Broadway in Boston

In bright, red glasses, Lenne Klingaman portrays Dawn with her own, magnetic, comedic timing.  Dreamy and shy, Dawn calls herself “a woman of many passions.”  She is unforgettable singing the yearning number, When He Sees Me.  With Jeremy Morse as scene stealing Ogie, they are a comedic force to be reckoned with.  Gleeful and goofy with a habit of over sharing, Jeremy Morse has even the cast trying to keep a straight face.  Morse’s comic timing is a bungle of flawless, unsuppressed energy.

Waitress Lenne and Jeremy

Lenne Klingaman & Jeremy Morse in the national tour of Waitress, photo by Joan Marcus and Matthew Murphy and courtesy of Broadway in Boston

Larry Marshall, with a wonderful laugh and a curmudgeonly personality, portrays difficult customer and diner owner, Joe.   A complicated storyteller with more insight than he seems, his conversations with Jenna is full of humor and openness.  Speaking to the uplifting spirit of this charming show, Joe proclaims, “Baking a pie is a magical experience.”

Waitress - Waitress and Joe

Desi Oakley & Larry Marshall in the national tour of Waitress, photo by Joan Marcus and Matthew Murphy and courtesy of Broadway in Boston

Click here to see where Waitress the Musical arrives next.  Lexus Broadway in Boston announces their new season on Monday, March 18 and is just getting started with popular musicals, On Your Feet, Disney’s Aladdin, Hamilton, and more.  Click here for more information, tickets, and upcoming news.  Follow Lexus Broadway in Boston on Twitter, Instagram, and Facebook.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

Hingham Civic Music Theatre will soon debut the humorous fairy tale with a twist, ‘Shrek the Musical’

Shrek the Musical

Hingham Civic Music Theatre debuts ‘Shrek the Musical for two weekends only from Oct 21 through Oct 29 Photo courtesy of Hingham Civic Music Theatre

Can an intimidating green ogre have what it takes to become an unlikely hero?  Get to know Shrek, Donkey, the Gingerbread Man, Three Blind Mice, The Three Little Pigs, Pinocchio, and many more iconic fairy tale creatures in an entirely new way as Hingham Civic Music Theatre debuts Shrek the Musical at the Sanborn Auditorium in Hingham Town Hall Saturday, October 21 and continuing for two weekends through Sunday, October 29.  Based on William Steig’s imaginative fairy tale that later launched into a beloved animated film starring Mike Myers and Cameron Diaz followed by many popular film sequels, Shrek the Musical adds a bit more to this thrilling, family adventure.  Click here for more information, tickets, and how to participate in the HCMT Fundraising campaign.

Featuring real life husband and wife Chris DiOrio as Shrek and Leslie DiOrio as Princess Fiona, Shrek is a lone, but not lonely, green ogre who lives a quiet swamp life until life as he knows it is threatened, forcing him to embark on an daunting quest to save a mysterious princess.  With heartwarming songs such as Don’t Let Me Go, Big Bright Beautiful World, This is How Dreams Come True, and the Monkees classic, I’m a BelieverShrek the Musical offers enough witty humor and heartwarming moments that will entertain children and adults alike.

Directed by Lisa Pratt, music by Jeanine Tesori, musically-directed by Mark Bono, with choreography by Tara McSweeney Morrison, Hingham Civic Music Theatre presents Shrek the Musical on Saturdays, October 21 and 28 as well as one Friday performance on October 27 at 7:30 p.m.  Sunday matinees will be held on October 22 and 29 at 2 p.m.  All shows take place at Hingham Town Hall, 210 Central Street in Hingham, Massachusetts.  Click here for further details, tickets, and be sure to follow Hingham Civic Music Theatre on Facebook for upcoming events and more.