REVIEW: TCAN Players’ classic comedy ‘Harvey’ full of imaginative charm

We’ve all had that peculiar relative.  It might be an odd extended family member that raises a few eyebrows at family gatherings.   A sweet and wonderful person that is often misunderstood.   In the Dowd family, that person is Elwood P. Dowd, a mix of old fashioned charm, amiability, and humbleness who just so happened to have inherited his mother’s estate.  He is a wealthy bachelor that likes to socialize around town and graciously supports his socialite sister and niece.  However, Elwood has something that probably no other relative you might know has in common…Elwood claims a large bunny called Harvey is always by his side.  Is he crazy?

Now, Harvey is no ordinary bunny.  He’s a rather extraordinary figure to anyone around him and he makes an incredible impact in TCAN Players classic comedy, Mary Chase’s Pulitzer Prize-winning Harvey continuing through Sunday, November 14 at TCAN Center for Arts in Natick, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Photo courtesy of TCAN Players

This popular 1944 production was adopted into an Oscar-winning film of the same name starring Jimmy Stewart, steeped in affable charm as Elwood and accomplished Josephine Hull, who nabbed an Oscar for Best Supporting Actress as Veta.  TCAN Players’ Harvey boasts a wonderful cast especially from Jo d’Angelo as Veta.  D’Angelo perfects Elwood’s dramatic, intense, at times hysterical, but caring socialite sister who certainly goes through quite a lot in the production’s full three acts.  She portrays fed up to a tee and her sharp comedic skills have her swinging from collected to sheer panic in an instant.  D’Angelo takes on this meaty role so naturally that it is easy to get swallowed up in her unending drama. 

Ashley Harmon gleefully portrays conspiratorial and impressionable Myrtle Mae, Veta’s cooped up daughter longing for adventure.  Scott Salley has a gift for comedy as seen in previous TCAN productions such as First Things First and he holds his own as he portrays the straight man in this production.  As resident psychiatrist Lyman Sanderson, Salley’s smooth, seemingly knowledgeable delivery with a touch of arrogance makes for a number of amusing moments.  He has great chemistry with Sylvia Czubarow as beautifully beaming and complex nurse Ruth Kelly who offers a few zingers of her own.  David Dooks depicts seemingly level headed and imposing psychiatrist William Chumley with gravitas and some good-natured absurdity, especially in scenes with delightful John Alzapiedi as Elwood.  Though the role of Elwood is so clearly made for Jimmy Stewart which brought Stewart an Oscar nomination, Alzapiedi clearly does not lean on the portrayal and makes compassionate and forthright Elwood his own.

Directed with vintage flair by Lisa Astbury, Harvey is set in the present, but from the classic songs bookending the show, the polished set design by Tom Powers, and Donna Cabibbo’s detailed, retro costumes nods to the show’s 1944 setting.  Warmly decorated in floral trim and vintage portraits hanging from the Dowd’s library as well as rotary telephones hearken to that era.  The costumes are also faithful to the period ranging from women adorned in floral dresses, rabbit furs, and sophisticated hats to men decked out in trench coats, ties, and sharp suits. The set is divided into two sides, the latter a typical doctor’s office.

Harvey delves into some darker places, but never let you forget it is a comedy.  Elwood’s lightheartedness seems to diffuse any stressful situation simply by Alzapiedi’s soothing, influential voice and good nature so the show never embarks into disturbing territory.  It is an exploration into relatable family dynamics, a touch of greed, and the power of a little faith.

TCAN Players presents Mary Chase’s inventive comedy Harvey live and in person through Sunday, November 14 at TCAN Center for Arts in Natick, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.

REVIEW: Footlight Club’s ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’ clever and comedic fun

It’s the age old question:  “What’s in a name?”  Apparently it makes all the difference in the world in Oscar Wilde’s classic play, The Importance of Being Earnest, a high society romantic farcical comedy written twenty years after The Footlight Club was established in 1877.  Full of adages about life and relationships as well as its fair share of ploys, elaborate scheming, love at first sight, and mistaken identity, The Importance of Being Earnest proves that some things are timeless.

The Footlight Club, the oldest running theatre in the nation, boasts renovations that include new seating and more at Eliot Hall.  Directed by David Marino, Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest continues at Eliot Hall in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts through Sunday, June 15.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

It is amazing to see how far theatre has come over the years.  The Importance of Being Earnest is a lighthearted production told in three acts with each act separated by the drop of the stage curtain.  It is refreshing to see this production in vintage form, especially in a day and age where rolling sets and elevated scenery eliminates the need to close the curtain until intermission.

The Footlight Club The Importance of Being Earnest Michael Jay and Frances Price

Michael Jay as Jack and Frances Price as Lady Bracknell Photo credit to Elizabeth Bean/Footlight Club

Zach Best, David Alger, and Cara Guappone’s elegantly-detailed set, which includes a brass chandelier, seemingly expensive wall hangings, and plush furniture, reflect 1895 London, where high society’s seemingly biggest worries are when to dine, when to have tea, and when to go to the club.  However, even in Audrey Stuck-Girard’s regal costumes, the rich nevertheless have their own relatable issues whether it’s over family, love, and happiness.

What keeps Oscar Wilde’s show so relevant is its witty and hilarious script, showing even the simplest things in life can be the most elusive.  Its comic observations about family, love and society can be scathing, but possess a remarkable ring of truth.

The madcap, clever cast has impressive comic timing, especially Bradley Boucher’s knack for physical humor as Algernon Moncrieff.  Back in 2002, Rupert Everett starred as Algernon Moncrieff at age 43 in the film adaptation joined by a stellar cast that included Colin Firth, Reese Witherspoon, Judi Dench, and Tom Wilkinson.  At first glance, Bradley Boutcher looked too young to portray the suave and sardonic Algernon, especially as he spends a great deal of the show making quips about life as only a well-experienced individual can.  However, Boutcher’s smug smile and shrewd comic timing gradually won me over despite some misgivings and he became quite a scene stealer.

Footlight Club The Importance of Being Earnest Elizabeth Loranth as Gwendolyn and Michael Jay as Jack Worthing

Elizabeth Loranth as Gwendolyn and Michael Jay as Jack Worthing Photo credit to Matt McKee/Footlight Club

Boutcher as Moncrieff and Michael Jay as excitable and anxious Jack Worthing share an amusing, competitive camaraderie as they attempt to prove one wiser than the other.  It is fun to see two very different personalities collide over something as trivial as muffins.

In an extravagant feathered hat, Frances Price flourishes as outspoken, society-minded Lady Augusta Bracknell.  Price strikes a delicate balance between well intentioned and intrusive, making distinguished Lady Bracknell likable, even when her lips curve into a judgmental frown.

Kevin Brunton’s droll presence as Lane/Merriman enhances each scene while Gabrielle Jaques as seemingly sweet, wide-eyed Cecily and Elizabeth Loranth as elegant Gwendolyn are fascinating to watch as their characters become increasingly more complicated.  Jennifer Bean as quirky, love struck Miss Prism and Tim Joseph as amiable Reverend Chasuble round out this stellar cast and make Earnest much more than a name, indeed.

Footlight Club The Importance of Being Earnest Jennifer Beam as Miss Prism and Tim Joseph as Reverend Chasuble

Jennifer Bean as Miss Prism and Tim Joseph as Reverend Chasuble Photo credit to Elizabeth Bean/Footlight Club

The Footlight Club presents Oscar Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest at Eliot Hall, 7A Eliot Street in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts through Sunday, June 15.  Click here for more information and tickets to Footlight’s Club final show of the season.