REVIEW: Greater Boston Stage Company and Front Porch Arts Collective’s ‘The Three Musketeers’ packs action, comedy, and a contemporary twist

‘The Three Musketeers‘ stands the test of time for a reason.  Full of swashbuckling adventure, revenge, humor, and romance, ‘The Three Musketeers’ has a universal appeal, a historical tale of three not-so-flawless defenders of the crown in dangerous 17th century Paris, a time where an ambush could take place at any moment.

Many different versions of this classic tale have taken over the stage and screen over the years and that is no surprise.  It’s a pliable tale with lots of room for creativity.

The Greater Boston Stage Company, in collaboration with The Front Porch Arts Collective, creates a re-imagined adaptation for their final production of the season.  This time, from fights to music to storyline to breaking the fourth wall, ‘The Three Musketeers’ weaves in the classic with the contemporary presenting a new twist of how this story could have played out.

Adapted by Catherine Bush from the novel by Alexandre Dumas, Greater Boston Stage Company continues ‘The Three Musketeers’ through Sunday, June 30 in Stoneham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.  Click here for more on the Front Porch Arts Collective.

Greater Boston Stage Company - The Three Musketeers cast

The Three Musketeers cast Photo courtesy of Greater Boston Stage Company

The last time the Sleepless Critic reviewed a show featuring the Front Porch Arts Collective, it was in collaboration with the Lyric Stage Company for the critically-acclaimed musical, ‘Breath and Imagination’ back in December.  It was a brilliant, dramatic piece with an incomparable performance by Davron S. Monroe as opera great Roland Hayes.

The Front Porch Arts Collective shows its lighter side with ‘The Three Musketeers.’  Though Alexandre Dumas’s novel can be a heavy read, the films and stage productions have always been an exciting romp with some adaptations better than others.  The Greater Boston Stage Company weaves together a wealth of elements, including stylized action sequences, a good dose of humor, eclectic, bolder costumes, and creative casting, but stays pretty faithful to the classic storyline otherwise.

‘The Three Musketeers’ follows Marc Pierre as a fresh-faced country boy named D’Artagnan who wishes to offer his services to the disheveled, world-weary Musketeers.  Pierre portrays D’Artagnan with a love struck charm, wide-eyed wonder, and transparency.  He’s an easy character to root for.

The Greater Boston Stage Company Tonasia Jones as Madame de Treville and Marc Pierre as D'Artagnan

Teaching the ropes. Tonasia Jones as Madame de Treville and Marc Pierre as D’Artagnan Photo courtesy of Greater Boston Stage Company

Instead of women as primarily damsels in distress, some of the damsels are the Musketeers themselves.  Paige Clark as Aremis and Lyndsey Allen Cox as Athos prove they are more than up to the challenge, showing prowess and agility in their perspective roles.  Cox as witty and sardonic Athos has some great lines in this show and one of the most memorable is “Love is a lottery whose prize is death.”  Along with James Richardo Milord, who gives gravitas to goofy, selfish, but well-meaning Porthos, this trio has good chemistry as they embark on new adventures.

The Greater Boston Stage Company - Maurice Emmanuel Parent as Cardinal Richelieu

Maurice Emmanuel Parent as Cardinal Richelieu Photo courtesy of Greater Boston Stage Company

The humor is there, especially from Maurice Emmanuel Parent, the Executive Director of Front Porch Arts Collective, as dastardly Cardinal Richelieu.  From his raised, mischievous eyebrow to his magnificent, resonating laugh as he occasionally lets the audience in on an elusive inside joke, he steals the show.  Tonesia Jones also gives a charismatic and commanding performance as Madame de Treville.  Her interaction with the Musketeers lands with drive and heart.

Margaret Clark is a spellbinding spitfire as M’Lady while J.T. Turner, wearing an eye patch, portrays shrewd and creepy Rocheford as he lurks in the shadows.

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What also stands out in this production is the exciting action and stellar fight scenes, led by fight director Angie Jepson.  From barrooms to the king’s court, the battles are fought valiantly with a good dose of comedy and high jinks.  This show takes a lot of modern liberties in a good fight and takes a more serious turn in the second half, so like a Musketeer, be prepared for anything.

Adapted by Catherine Bush from the novel by Alexandre Dumas, Greater Boston Stage Company, in collaboration with The Front Porch Arts Collective, continues ‘The Three Musketeers’ through Sunday, June 30 at 395 Main Street in Stoneham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets and here for a closer look at Front Porch Arts Collective.

REVIEW: Greater Boston Stage Company’s intriguing ‘Onegin’ offers vodka, love at first sight, and a whirlwind of surprises

Combine an onstage rock band nicknamed the Ungrateful Dead with a storytelling cast in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia.  Throw in love at first sight, a duel, add some vodka, and a few winks to today’s technology and it is quite the tale…and that’s not even the half of it.

Expect the unexpected at Greater Boston Stage Company’s unique performance of Onegin, a semi-interactive musical that blends the traditional with the contemporary in surprising ways.  It explores how far one would go for love while its rock and roll vibe and comic moments show it doesn’t take itself too seriously.

Based on Alexandr Pushkin’s poem of the same name and Tchaikovsky’s opera, Greater Boston Stage Company continues Onegin’s United States debut at the Stoneham Theatre in Stoneham, Massachusetts through Sunday, March 31.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Onegin - cast

From L to R: Michael Jennings Mahoney as Vlaimir Lensky, Music Director Steve Bass (on piano), Mark Linehan as Evgeni Onegin, Josephine Moshiri Elwood as Olga, Sarah Pothier as Tatyana, and Peter Adama as Prince Gremin Photo by Maggie Hall Photography/Greater Boston Stage Company

Onegin pushes quite a few boundaries within its two hour time frame.  The show inhabits a myriad of genres and occasionally breaks the fourth wall, but underneath it all is a moving tale of love and loss and what it means when destiny is out of your hands.  The contemporary flair of this period piece may not appeal to staunch traditionalists, but the show has heart.

Katheryn Monthei’s open set design topped with sparkling brass chandeliers and silk backdrops mixed with Deirdre Gerrard’s detailed costumes and Ilyse Robbins’ dynamic choreography depict a romantic, yet edgy vibe indicative of this strong and versatile cast.

Onegin Lensky

Michael Jennings Mahoney as Vladimir Lensky Photo by Maggie Hall Photography/Greater Boston Stage Company

Opening with the rollicking number A Love Song, these singing storytellers describe a man irretrievably in love and one who is roguishly indifferent to it. Michael Jennings Mahoney portrays excitable and lovelorn poet, Vladimir Lensky.  Lensky could have been a one note character, but Mahoney gives him dimension and makes him much more than he seems.   He is taken with Olga, portrayed with complexity and practicality by Josephine Moshiri Elwood.  Enter Evgeni Onegin, portrayed with a deep vibrato and roguish charm by Mark Linehan.  Linehan is charismatic, but also possesses a cynical, world-weary look on life while Tatyana, portrayed with pensive idealism by Sarah Pothier, may just change everything.

ONEGIN at GBSC

Sarah Pothier as Tatyana and Mark Linehan as Evgeni Onegin Photo courtesy of Nile Hawver/Nile Scott Shots

A few highlights include Sarah Pothier’s commanding performance of Let Me Die and stunning performances of In Your House and My Dearest Comrade by the cast.   Expect the unexpected at Onegin and like this engaging cast, prepare to have a little fun.

Directed by Weylin Symes, Greater Boston Stage Company’s musical drama Onegin continues through Sunday, March 31.  Click here for more information and tickets.  Click here for a closer look at Greater Boston’s Stage Company’s recently announced season.

 

 

 

 

 

CAEG’s ‘Princess Zhaojun’s’ Yang Donglin envisions how one woman united a nation

Continuing with the theme of International Women’s Day is a show about real life heroine.  During the Han Dynasty, an amazing, intelligent woman considered one of the four beauties of Ancient China left the world she knew to marry Huhanye in order to achieve peace on the Northern Border of China.

Princess Zhaojun, presented by China Arts and Entertainment Group (CAEG), is a compelling dance drama and features detailed, beautiful sets and costumes.  The Sleepless Critic interviewed accomplished costume designer Yang Donglin about his work and what is was like to visually bring the Han Dynasty and this story to life.

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China National Opera and Dance Drama Theatre present Princess Zhaojun for one weekend only at the Boch Shubert Theatre in Boston, MA March 16-17.  Its mission is to share traditional and contemporary Chinese performing arts around the world.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Yang Donglin

Accomplished costume designer Yang Donglin Photo courtesy of China Performing Arts Agency

Sleepless Critic:  Is this your first time working with the China Performing Arts Agency and what other shows have you worked on?

Yang Donglin:  For China Performing Arts Agency I was costume designer for the dance drama Confucius when it toured the US in 2017 and Dragon Boat Racing in 2016 and 2018.  I have also worked in dance drama for Du Fu, Chinese Orphan, Lotus and Li Bai and Opera for Jianzhen Crosses the Ocean to Japan, Turandot, The White-Haired Girl and Peasant Takes a Wife.

Princess Zhaojun. China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater. (20)

Princess Zhaojun. Photo courtesy of China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater

SC:  The China Performing Arts Agency has a reputation for featuring the most beautiful costumes and scenery I have ever seen and Princess Zhaojun is no different.  I saw the Soaring Wings production last January and it was stunning.  This show serves as a piece of Chinese history and Princess Zhaojun is a real person who lived during the Han Dynasty.  Please tell me about how you selected and put together the costumes for this show.

YD:  I added proper contemporary interpretation of the piece instead of simply copying and restoring what it looked like in history.  We need to constantly deny ourselves and make textured clothing that can keep abreast of the body language expression of our actors. Taking Zhaojun for example, we have tried to change at least 5-6 kinds of fabrics to make a sample, and the director has even personally tried it on for rehearsal action until the most satisfactory texture and effect comes out.

Artistic creation is neither restoring history nor making things up. We have incorporated more dramatic elements into the traditional Han dynasty clothing, and many of the costumes are inspired by the wooden terracotta figures, Han portrait stones, and bricks portraits in the ancient Han dynasty tombs. At the same time, costumes are endowed with different souls according to the personalities and fates of the characters. For example, the overall cool color of the Han dynasty palace and the warm orange color on the grassland have all indicated the change in the character of the protagonist.

Princess Zhaojun. China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater. (12)

Princess Zhaojun. Photo courtesy of China National Opera & Dance Drama Theater

SC:  What has been the most difficult part of putting this show together and what has been the best part?

The most difficult part is finding the balance between the communication of the main actors’ images and the restriction of their dance movements in single, double, or triple dance.  The most satisfying is the characteristics of each costume are exactly the same as the director’s ideas such as the leashed called dance, free Zigui dance, and bold pouring wax dance full of exotic flavors. Each has its own traits, but together they have a unified style to construct distinctive aesthetic style on the stage.

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SC:  What do you like best about being a costume designer?

YD:  I like the creativity.  I like the feeling of swimming freely in the ocean of creation.

Witness Yang Donglin’s exceptional costume design and experience China National Opera and Dance Drama Theatre’s Princess Zhaojun for one weekend only at the Boch Shubert Theatre at 265 Tremont Street in Boston, MA March 16-17.  Click here for more information and tickets.  Click here for more about China Arts and Entertainment Group and their future productions.

 

REVIEW: Athletic grace, intensity, and enchanting beauty drive The Boston Ballet’s debut of ‘Obsidian Tear’

Featuring an enthralling, unconventional start, renowned choreographers depict a rich array of contrasting tones as The Boston Ballet opened its 2017-18 season with the captivating, North American debut of Obsidian Tear continuing through Sunday, November 12 at the Boston Opera House in Boston, Massachusetts.  What is particularly intriguing about this program is its delicate balance of triumph, suspense, sorrow, and beauty in a blend of traditional and contemporary artistry featuring two revered works by composer Jean Sibelius.  Click here for more information and tickets.

The Boston Ballet strikes an impressive, emotional balance with the combination of a special, orchestral performance of Finlandia by Jean Sibelius, Obsidian Tear, and Fifth Symphony of Jean Sibelius.  Led by guest conductor Daniel Stewart, the Boston Ballet opened with a stirring orchestral performance of the Finnish National song, Finlandia, composed as a tone poem by Jean Sibelius.  Magnificently led by conductor Daniel Stewart, Finlandia is a triumphant, gripping masterpiece from its ferocious open to every subtle, enchanting note in between.

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Boston Ballet in Wayne McGregor’s Obsidian Tear; photo by Rosalie O’Connor, courtesy Boston Ballet

The Boston Ballet added to its fervent tone with the North American debut of Obsidian Tear followed by the elegant, world premiere of Fifth Symphony of Jean Sibelius.  Choreographed by Wayne McGregor and accompanied by the haunting and evocative rhythms of Esa-Pekka Salonen’s Lachen verlernt and Nyx from violin soloist, Christine Vitale, Obsidian Tear builds to a palpable sense of urgency as each of the nine male dancers, including Daniel Cooper, Derek Dunn, Samivel Evans, John Lam, Alexander Maryianowski, Eric Nezha, Patrick Palkens, Desean Taber, and Junxiong Zhou, appear.

Obsidean Dress Rehearsal

Irlan Silva in Wayne McGregor’s Obsidian Tear; photo by Rosalie O’Connor, courtesy Boston Ballet

Surrounded by a warmly-lit stage and minimal black backdrop, each dancer exhibits their own, distinct appearance and style, gliding in long, sweeping movements.  Often dividing into pairs, their athletic prowess drives each complex step as exuberance, mischief, cooperation, and combativeness, flood an increasingly busy landscape.  Thrilling and poignant, Obsidian Tear is a thought-provoking, mesmerizing journey about belonging and the darkness within.

New Jorma Dress Rehearsal

Boston Ballet in Jorma Elo’s Fifth Symphony of Jean Sibelius; photo by Rosalie O’Connor, courtesy Boston Ballet

The world premiere of Fifth Symphony of Jean Sibelius, gorgeously choreographed by Jorma Elo, evokes the light, romantic tone of traditional ballet.  The pure, delicate beauty of the ensemble in pale pastel envelops the stage in graceful splendor as a single black halo hovers above.  In elegant costumes designed by former Dutch National ballet dancer Yumiko Takeshima, Fifth Symphony of Jean Sibelius delivers its own sophisticated rhythm, building into a flurry of circular motion and blossoming lifts.  As some divide into attractive pairs, dancers soar, leap, and float joyfully to a soft, urgent rhythm.  A particular highlight depicts the dancers lying sideways across the stage as a pair nimbly twirls into pirouettes and refined lifts.  As Obsidian Tear often focuses on individuals, this performance is much more an ensemble piece, forming dazzling soft color portraits in a breezy, jovial state.

New Jorma Dress Rehearsal

Boston Ballet in Jorma Elo’s Fifth Symphony of Jean Sibelius; photo by Rosalie O’Connor, courtesy Boston Ballet

Click here for tickets, call 617-695-6955, or visit the Boston Ballet box office at 19 Clarendon Street in Boston, Massachusetts. All performances take place at the Boston Opera House, 539 Washington Street in Boston, Massachusetts. Subscriptions and group rates are also available. Follow the Boston Ballet on Facebook and Twitter.

REVIEW: ‘L.A. Dance Project’ closed Celebrity Series of Boston’s season with powerful, message-driven performances

Another spectacular season of Celebrity Series of Boston has come to an end, but not without an intriguing and dynamic finale by L.A. Dance Project, packing a punch with their surprising footwork.  The final performance also featured a free, interactive post-show talk with Ballet Master Sébastien Marcovici.  Celebrity Series of Boston’s 2017-18 season will premiere in October with multi-talented performer Alan Cumming.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Playful, vibrant, and at times haunting, L.A. Dance Project, closed out the Celebrity Series of Boston’s season at the Shubert Theatre from May 19-21. Led by Benjamin Millepied, an acclaimed dancer and choreographer known for choreographing the award-winning film, Black Swan, L.A. Dance Project’s three complex and contemporary dance segments offer its share of joy and conflict while inspiring strong emotions throughout the performance.

L.A. Dance Project

‘Harbor Me’ (Morgan Lugo, Robbie Moore, Aaron Carr) Photo courtesy of Robert Torres/Celebrity Series of Boston

Accompanied by a haunting oboe featured in a dynamic medley by Park Woojae, Harbor Me by Sidi Larbi Cherkaoui delivers a powerful message about human nature and looking past what is on the surface.  Fragments of light stripe the floor as shadows sway ominously on the walls.  Dressed in fatigues and urban clothing in browns, blues and greens, Stephanie Amurao, Julia Eichten, and Lilja Ruriksdottir interact with each other in a ballet-infused variation of unity, imitation, reflection, and conflict.  They move in a fascinating flurry of abstract movement that both celebrates unity as well as emphasize the dark side of human nature as the music intensifies.

LA Dance Project Murder Ballades

Murder Ballades (Nathan Makolandra, Rachelle Rafailedes) Photo courtesy of Robert Torres/Celebrity Series of Boston

Worn sneakers possess a mighty significance as dancers, dressed youthfully in shirts and shorts, unite in a vigorous and charming performance, the second dance segment of the afternoon.  The lighthearted, violin-infused music possesses a mounting urgency set upon a vibrant water, gold, and black background.  The lithe men and women ensemble, featuring Stephanie Amurao, Aaron Carr, Julia Eichten, Nathan B. Makolandra, Robbie Moore, and Rachel Rafailedes, are blissful and uplifting in smooth, sweeping steps.  They perform pirouettes with zeal, twirl, dip, and hook arms in a display of sweet innocence.  In a particularly humorous moment, as the dancers exited the stage, rambunctious dancer Janie Taylor, carried away by the music, was yanked offstage at the last moment. The performance, entitled Murder Ballades by Justin Peck, is a response to real life, tragic events that children have endured in Aurora and Sandy Hook.  It is a beautiful, spirited tribute to youth, but not without a sense of foreboding.

LA Dance Project Janie Taylor

‘Murder Ballades’ (Janie Taylor) Photo courtesy of Robert Torres/Celebrity Series of Boston

The final dance, On the Other Side, is an intriguing compilation by acclaimed artistic director and choreographer Benjamin Millepied.  With an extraordinary emphasis of color by costume designer Alessandro Sartori and bright, multicolored background art by Mark Bradford, On the Other Side taps into a wondrous reverie featuring dancers Stephanie Amurao, Aaron Carr, David Adrian Freeland Jr., Morgan Lugo, Robbie Moore, Rachel Rafailedes, Lilia Ruriksdottir, and Janie Taylor.  Each color in the artwork seems to come to life in each dancer as they spin, twirl, and skip along.  The piano tune, by Philip Glass, also builds to a crescendo as duets perform a mix of traditional ballet and contemporary dance and then gather center stage, as if yanked out of a reverie.

LA Dance Project Rachelle Rafailedes

‘On the Other Side’ (Rachelle Rafailedes) Photo courtesy of Robert Torres/Celebrity Series of Boston

Click here to learn more about L.A. Dance Project and future performances.  Follow L.A. Project on Facebook.  Celebrity Series of Boston will be back for another stellar season featuring celebrity appearances, dance, comedy, and more.  Click here for more information, subscriptions, tickets, and how to support Celebrity Series of Boston.  Get further updates on Celebrity Series of Boston on Facebook.

REVIEW: Cohasset Dramatic Club proves life is too short to miss the insightful musical, ‘If/Then’

Mix in a dash of the Tony award-winning musical, Rent, a hint of HBO’s hit show, Sex and the City, and stir in the thought-provoking film, Sliding Doors, and what emerges is a real treat in Cohasset Dramatic Club’s musical drama, If/Then.  Set in New York City and based on a book by Tom Kitt, If/Then is an unpredictable, immersive tale that explores destiny, love, happiness, and the complexity of navigating through life’s surprises.

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Cohasset Dramatic Club is thrilled to debut “If/Then” through Saturday, March 25 Photo courtesy of Cohasset Dramatic Club

 

Cohasset Dramatic Club is thrilled to be the first in the US to present this stirring, humorous musical after its professional Broadway run and national tour.  Directed by Lisa Pratt and technically directed by Mark Bono, If/Then continues at Cohasset Town Hall in Cohasset, Massachusetts through Saturday, March 25.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Is the path to happiness completely random or is destiny derived from the right choices?  Elizabeth Vaughn, portrayed masterfully by Ann McCoy, is a successful urban planner who decides to make a fresh start in New York City.  Everyone seems to think they know what is best for her, which helps lead Elizabeth onto two, unexpected paths.

Featuring a vibrant cast with realistic conflicts and fleshed out characters, Ann McCoy as conflicted, soulful Elizabeth Vaughn is the heart of the show, a meaty role originated by Idina Menzel on Broadway.  Dressed in a sharp black pants suit, McCoy is more than up to the challenge, portraying a woman who was once certain of life’s direction, but lately, her confidence has waned.  McCoy impressively depicts Elizabeth’s cautiousness through a shift in her eyes and yet, also brings out the character’s lively impulsiveness.  She heeds other people’s advice, but ultimately follows her heart.  A soprano, Ann McCoy’s vocals dip and soar, hitting challenging notes with ease.  This is especially evident in the numbers, You Learn to Live Without and Always Starting Over.

One of McCoy’s greatest strengths is the natural, unique chemistry she shares with each cast member.  Elizabeth is single, but not lonely.  Michelle Margulies portrays Kate’s incredibly charming and outspoken friend.  Margulies as Kate is engaging, fun-loving, and a bit of a scene stealer.  She is Elizabeth’s biggest fan and only has her best interests at heart.  Perpetually optimistic, Margulies offers a soulful and comical rendition of the number, It’s a Sign, playfully engaging the crowd.

CDC If Then Ann McCoy and Michael Warner

Ann McCoy as Elizabeth and Michael Warner as Josh depict great chemistry in ‘If/Then’ Photo courtesy of Cohasset Dramatic Club

Ann McCoy and Michael Warner are local community talents known for various productions on the South Shore, shine in their roles.  Michael Warner is compelling as caring, forthright, and unassuming army surgeon Josh, a man also clearly torn between two life choices.  He delivers a touching rendition of the song, Hey Kid.  Elizabeth and Josh’s chemistry is hopeful and passionate.  They create great harmony together, especially during the song, Here I Go.

While Josh is practical, Ricky DeSisto is a natural as impulsive and endearing Lucas.  With his earnest, idealistic nature and fair share of cynicism, one cannot help but root for him through life.  Through lighthearted teasing and sweet glances, Elizabeth and Lucas have a warm, playful chemistry.    Their song together, Some Other Me is moving.  Rob Buckel-Gillis portrays hopeful, supportive David, a surgeon.  He is hopeful, likable, and optimistic.  Lucas and David share a tender duet, The Best Worst Mistake You Ever Made.

CDC If Then Michelle Margulies Ann McCoy and Ricky DeSisto

Michelle Marguies as Kate, Ann McCoy as Elizabeth and Ricky DeSisto as Lucas in ‘If/Then’ Photo courtesy of Cohasset Dramatic Club

Elegantly dressed in a suit and tie, Mike Nakashima portrays Stephen, a complex character with mysterious intentions.  Determined and serious, Stephen and Elizabeth share a career-minded camaraderie as he encourages her to follow her dreams, seeing her boundless potential.

With music and lyrics by Brian Yorkey,  an intimate band including Music Director Sarah Troxler on piano, guitarist Jack Byrne, percussionist Michael Hobbs, bassist Jon Lay, Clarinet/Flute/Saxophone Glenn Silvia, and Cassie Sulbaran on Viola bring to life this upbeat, contemporary musical with a libretto.  Clever blocking brings part of the band onstage.

Costume and props designer Irene Vifides lend to New York City’s urban vibe and signature style through big, designer purses, fashionable shoes, and impressive, colorful costumes that vary from sophisticated, city attire to a casual night in.  Scenic artist Denise Feeney and Scenic projection designers Erin and Patrick Dzierzak and Dramatic Sounds create urban ambiance with recreated city sounds, black and white city skylines, and a wealth of broad, colorful landscapes depicting a few of New York City’s most famous landmarks.  One of this show’s many highlights is the humorous depiction of NYC’s tiny apartments.  Cohasset Dramatic Club brings to life a captivating musical depicting how complicated life can be and proving it’s also too short to miss If/Then.

Directed by Lisa Pratt, musically directed by Sarah Troxler, and choreographed by Tara Morrison, Cohasset Dramatic Club presents If/Then through March 25 at 7:30.  All performances will be held at Cohasset Town Hall 41 Highland Ave in Cohasset, Massachusetts.   Click here for more information and for tickets.

Other ways to support Cohasset Dramatic Club is to become a volunteer and make a donation.  Sign up for their email list to learn about upcoming events and more.  Click here for more about the Cohasset Dramatic Club and follow them on Facebook.

Cohasset Dramatic Club presents the local premiere of the romantic musical, ‘If/Then’

It’s a story about love and the single woman in the Big City with a twist.  For Elizabeth, portrayed by Ann McCoy, a newly-single woman about to make a fresh start in New York City, life has become a world of daunting, yet wonderful possibilities.  From the producers of the Pulitzer prize-winning team behind the show, Next to Normal Cohasset Dramatic Club is proud to present the first non-professional production of If/Then, an insightful, contemporary musical about a recently divorced woman caught between choice and chance.

Originally starring Idina Menzel and based on a book by Tom Kitt with music and lyrics by Brian Yorkey, If/Then contains moving musical numbers such as A Map of New York, You Never Know, and Surprise.  Directed by Lisa Pratt, musically directed by Sarah Troxler, and choreographed by Tara Morrison, Cohasset Dramatic Club presents If/Then for two weekends only on March 17, 18, 23, 24, and 25 at 7:30.  One matinee performance takes place on March 19 at 2 p.m.  All performances will be held at Cohasset Town Hall at 41 Highland Ave in Cohasset, Massachusetts.   Click here for more information and for tickets.

Other ways to support Cohasset Dramatic Club is to become a volunteer, become a subscriber, and make a donation.  Sign up for their email list to learn about upcoming events and more.  Click here for more about the Cohasset Dramatic Club and follow them on Facebook.

REVIEW: Boston Ballet presents William Forsythe’s brilliantly compelling ‘Artifact’

World-renowned choreographer William Forsythe, dressed in a baseball cap and modest attire, addressed an eager, mesmerized audience in a post-show talk with Boston Ballet’s acclaimed Artistic Director Mikko Nissinen after the evening performance of William Forsythe’s Artifact on Saturday, March 25.  Mikko Nissinen introduced Forsythe with enthusiasm and said that working with him has been a lifelong dream fulfilled.  William Forsythe and Boston Ballet’s Artistic Director Mikko Nissinen have a five-year partnership, working together to establish each season’s performances, highlighting one of Forsythe’s exceptional works each year.

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The Boston Ballet Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor/Boston Ballet

Friendly and unassuming, Forsythe spoke about his beautifully-unconventional production, Artifact, a piece he created over 30 years ago and a work that audiences and critics alike have embraced ever since.  Veiled on the Boston Opera House stage and enhanced with minimal props, lies a complex, timeless, and thought-provoking masterpiece which makes a powerful statement on the essence of the art of ballet.  Shown in its full length, Forsythe revised Artifact’s finale specifically for the Boston Ballet, which is a thrilling, compelling spectacle that blends classical and contemporary dance in a unique way.

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Boston Ballet presents ‘Artifact’ Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor/Boston Ballet

Boston Ballet presents William Forsythe’s Artifact through Sunday, March 5 at the Boston Opera House.  Click here for tickets, call 617-695-6955, or visit the Boston Ballet box office at 19 Clarendon Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Take a closer look at William Forsythe’s Artifact here.

Blending humor, philosophy, drama, and a wide range of traditional and contemporary ballet, William Forsythe’s Artifact, since the show was introduced, set a significant precedent in the inspiring works that followed.  A production packed with a wide range of welcome surprises, each distinct character offers their own insight into this mysterious tale.  Featuring a shimmering backdrop that matched the majestic, glittering black gown worn by Dana Caspersen, a statuesque woman in grey portrayed by Caralin Curcio, and a dapper, yet frustrated older man with megaphone portrayed by Nicholas Champion, Artifact is an intensely fascinating work from its start.

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Raina Sawai as Woman in Gray and Nicholas Champion as Man with Megaphone

Caspersen’s performance is  full of jubilance and inquisitiveness from the moment she welcomed the audience with a peerless smile.  Curcio delivers a haunting, athletic, and captivating non-verbal performance, her movements sharp, poised, and vigorous while she appears in unexpected places.  Dignified and authoritative, Champion’s dynamic performance boasts comedic moments, especially in his interaction with Caspersen.  While Champion’s musings are incomprehensible and muffled, Caspersen’s seem philosophical and poetic.

Artifact, divided into four parts like a symphony, features piano by Margot Kazimirska and delves into a full range of emotions as the piano seems to have a mind of its own, often breaking convention.  The music, featuring J.S. Boch: Chaconne from Partita Nr. 2 BWV 1004 in D-Minor by Nathan Milstein, Sound Collage by William Forsythe, and music from composer and pianist Eva Crossman-Hecht, progresses from playful to somber then frantic to rhythmic.

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Sao Hye Han and Paul Craig in William Forsythe’s ‘Artifact’ Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor

Dressed in rich, vibrant color and launching into choreography ranging from romantic and sweeping to freestyle to stiff and regimented, the Boston Ballet often break convention under the direction of Curcio.  A few of the highlights are ballet dancers breaking away into romantic, sweeping duets as they spin, sway, and soar.  With a verbal countdown, they perform intrinsic dance combinations such as a row of dancers drop to the floor in unison, embracing.  Another thrilling highlight is the ballet directs the curtain to lift and close, creating snapshots of various, choreographed scenes.  As Artifact culminates into an unpredictable, uplifting, and magnificent finale, unified dancers are as mesmerizing as the dancers breaking away into frantic, dynamic arrangements, performing pirouettes to a wild rhythm, blossoming into a new entity.

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Seo Hye Han and the Boston Ballet in ‘Artifact’ Photo courtesy of Rosalie O’Connor/Boston Ballet

Click here for tickets, call 617-695-6955, or visit the Boston Ballet box office at 19 Clarendon Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Subscriptions and group rates are also available. Follow the Boston Ballet on Twitter.

The Boston Ballet’s 2017-18 season boasts masterful works such as Kylian/Wings of Wax from March 23 through April 2, Robbins/The Concert from May 5 through May 27, Obsidian Tear from November 3 through November 12, and the return of Tchaikovsky’s beloved holiday classic, Mikko Nissinen’s The Nutcracker from November 24 through December 31, 2017.  Click here for a closer look at all of Boston Ballet’s 2017-18 season highlights.

‘Wicked,’ ‘Something Rotten,’ & ‘Finding Neverland’ part of Lexus Broadway in Boston’s new season

Rolling in the New Year with a comedy behind the birth of the first musical, Lexus Broadway in Boston blends beloved, Tony award-winning classics and enthralling, contemporary musicals full of mystery and magic.  Lexus Broadway in Boston offers a sensational, dynamic combination of shows kicking off with a humorous look at the birth of the musical with Something Rotten to the stage adaptation of J.M. Barrie’s birth of Peter Pan with Finding Neverland.  All productions are held at the Boston Opera House, 539 Washington Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Click here for a closer look at upcoming shows, tickets, and how to become a season subscriber.  Like Broadway in Boston on Facebook for updates.

Alternating from the 90s to the 1590s, the musical comedy, Something Rotten, delves into the height of Shakespeare’s time as two brothers discover the key to success may be a musical.  Songs include Welcome to the Renaissance, Hard to Be the Bard, and It’s Eggs.  Something Rotten will take place from Monday, January 16 through Sunday, January 29.

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Touring cast of musical comedy, ‘Something Rotten’

Set in tumultuous pre-World War II Germany and with classic numbers such as Maybe This Time and Willkommen, enter the Kit Kat Club for the classic musical, Cabaret.  Full of raucous songs and outrageous choreography, The Roundabout Theatre Company presents this musical classic to celebrate their 50th anniversary from Tuesday, January 31 through Sunday, February 12.  Cabaret contains mature content.

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The cast of Roundabout Theatre Company’s national tour of ‘Cabaret’

A murder-mystery set around a brilliant fifteen year-old boy, The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time is a Tony award-winning play based on Mark Haddon’s bestselling novel of the same name.  The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time takes place from Tuesday, March 7 through Sunday, March 19.  This show contains adult language and themes.

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Adam Langdon as Christopher Boone & the cast of the touring production of ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time’

Tony award-winner of 2015’s ‘Best Revival of the Musical,’ revisit Rodgers and Hammerstein’s sweeping, romantic musical classic, The King and I.  This captivating musical explores the extraordinary relationship between the King of Siam and a British schoolteacher featuring the classic numbers, Hello Young Lovers, I Have Dreamed, and Shall We Dance.  See The King and I on Tuesday, April 11 through Sunday, April 23.

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Jose Llana as The King of Siam & Laura Michelle Kelly as Anna Leonowens in ‘The King and I’ tour.

This summer, embark on a magical journey into Peter Pan author, J.M. Barrie’s imagination with Finding Neverland.  Set in London, struggling playwright J.M. Barrie is looking for inspiration for a big hit when he meets a family so rich in creativity and make-believe, it may change his entire life.  Full of visually-stunning effects and touching drama, Finding Neverland arrives on Tuesday, August 8 and continues through Sunday, August 20.

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The cast of ‘Finding Neverland’ tour

Broadway in Boston also proudly presents season options Wicked, The Illusionists, and the farewell tour of Mamma Mia.  Click here for tickets to Lexus Broadway in Boston’s  new season.