REVIEW: PTP/NYC presents enthralling family mystery, ‘The House in Scarsdale’

Dan has a complicated relationship with his estranged family.

Director Christian Parker of ‘The House in Scarsdale’ Photo courtesy of PTC/NYC

Directed by Christian Parker and written by playwright and actor Dan O’Brien, Dan embarks on more than just a spiritual journey in The House in Scarsdale: a memoir for the stageThe House in Scarsdale is the third play within Potomac Theatre Project(PTP/NYC’s) virtual series that has been running each weekend from September 24 through Sunday, October 18.

 Dan O’Brien’s The House in Scarsdale streamed from Thursday, October 8 through Sunday, October 11 and Caryl Churchill’s Far Away continues through Sunday, October 18 on PTC/NYC’s YouTube channel.   Viewings are free, but donations are welcome to support PTC/NYC with ten percent of the proceeds supporting The National Black Theatre.  Click here for the complete list of productions in PTP/NYC’s virtual series.

 In what can be described as a play within a prospective play, The House in Scarsdale visits the darkest of dysfunction as Dan, a journalist, visits various family members and others to learn more about his family’s past for his upcoming autobiographical play.  Audiences travel alongside Dan on his journey from the Garden State Parkway to as far as Europe as he investigates a possible family secret. What makes this show unique is not only is it a mystery, but as the details unfold, how much of the truth do you really want to know about your family?  Every family has their problems, but some secrets cannot be fathomed. 

The House in Scarsdale stars the show’s own playwright Dan O’Brien as Dan and Alex Draper portrays several dynamic characters throughout the production.  Draper seamlessly sinks right into each role, navigating an assortment of colorful characters from Dan’s resentful grandmother to his eccentric uncle.  Draper is expressive and spirited, clearly enjoying each transition.  His conversations with O’Brien have moments of dark humor, relatable family banter, and a good dose of stark, stirring honesty. 

The show is figuratively and literally on a journey to learn more about Dan’s troubled family, a family so dysfunctional that poor Dan has been cast out of his family circle hence its ironic opening quote by John Cheever, ‘Come back, come back, my wretched, feeble and unwanted child.’ Dan understandably wants to know why. As Dan’s extended family recall his family’s wild tendencies and various psychoses, Dan’s low key and unassuming demeanor makes one think that perhaps he has been through much more than he lets on. 

Dan is a quiet, inquisitive soul and depicts his emotional detachment with a skilled subtlety.  His conflicted nature between trepidation and yearning is fascinating as he ventures deeper into his family history becoming so invested and anxious about what he might find, he even visits a psychic.  Some of his family recollections are universal and lighthearted and every family has a degree of unhealthy dysfunction, but other memories are dreadfully concerning. 

So, as some answers come to light and more questions arise, how much is Dan like his family and how much of the story can be trusted?  The House in Scarsdale lures you in and leaves you engrossed in its outcome, hoping for a light at the end of this tunnel.

Potomac Theatre Project or PTC/NYC is located at 330 West 16th Street in New York City. Click here for more information and how to support PTP/NYC’s current and upcoming productions.

Milton Players present comedy, ‘Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike’ as well as upcoming auditions

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‘Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike’ cast Courtesy of Elizabeth Bean

Taking a zany, comedic look at a dysfunctional family’s bickering and grudges, Milton Players proudly present the Tony award-winning play, Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike through Sunday, February 5 in Canton, Massachusetts.  The original, off-Broadway cast included Emmy and Tony award-winner David Hyde Pierce and Golden Globe-winner Sigourney Weaver.  Click here for more information and tickets.

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Liz Echmen as Cassandra and Kevin Lowney as Vanya Courtesy of Elizabeth Bean

Written by Christopher Durang and directed by Wendy Stuart, Milton Players’ 84th season offers a show about middle-aged siblings and their wild circumstances, culminating in a fight over their ancestral home.  With sharp dialogue derived from Anton Chekhov, ‘Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike’ feature local cast members Kevin Lowney as Vanya, Barbara Schapiro as Sonia, Claire Lukazcyn as Masha, Chris Cartier as Spike, Liz Eacmen as Cassandra, and Jana Urban-Geyer as Nina.

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Jana Urban-Geyer as Nina and Chris Cartier as Spike Courtesy of Elizabeth Bean

Remaining performances take place on Friday, February 3 and Saturday, February 4 at 8 p.m.  One matinee show will be held on Sunday, February 5 at 2 p.m.  All shows are held at Brayton School Auditorium in Canton, Massachusetts. Click here for tickets, here for directions, call 617-698-7469, or email them at email@miltonplayers.org for further information.

Milton Players changes gears with their spring production, Frederick Knott’s ‘Dial M for Murder’ directed by Eric Stulb.  Adapted into a thrilling film by Alfred Hitchcock, auditions will be held on Tuesday, February 7 and Wednesday, February 8 at 7 p.m.  The show kicks off in April.  Click here for more information on auditions and more.  Follow Milton Players on Facebook for further updates.