REVIEW: Currently on tour, The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow raised the roof at Club Passim for album release party

Part of what makes folk music fascinating are the inflections of various genres weaved into each track.  Add some insightful lyrics and it creates its own unique journey.  Unlike other music genres, folk experiments a wide variety of eclectic rhythms.  Currently on tour, rock and roots folk music band The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow does one better.  Each band member writes and performs their own songs, voiced from their own perspectives.

Very much a collaborative band, The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow, made up of singer-songwriters and musicians Greg Smith, David Tanklefsky, Billy KeaneTory Hanna, and banjo picker Chris Merenda all have distinctive styles, but when they collaborate, it is spot on.  They have attended songwriting retreats together and collaborate on each of their compositions in various stages of completion, so everything syncs with the band’s sound the way it should.

Whiskey Treaty Roadshow Tour Schedule 2019

The “Band Together” tour schedule Photo courtesy of The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow

The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow returned to Club Passim celebrating the release of their new album, ‘Band Together‘ and played for some familiar faces on June 7.  With band members hailing from different parts of Massachusetts including the Berkshires and Boston, the sold out crowd was thrilled as each of its five members made their individual entrances onto Club Passim’s stage.  Click here to see where The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow will appear next, here for an interview with band member, David Tanklefsky, and here for more on Club Passim.

Sam Chase from Scituate opened for the Whiskey Treaty Roadshow, and there was a brief intermission before the band took the stage.  From quiet, horn-infused reflections in ‘Reasons‘ to the rolling and the ebb and flow rhythms of ‘Jimmy the Whiskey Boy,’ ‘Rock n Roll Déjà Vu,’ and ‘Perfect Day,’ to the lightning-fast, freestyle tempo of ‘Born to Pick Bluegrass’ to observations on the current state of the world with ‘Hey Lady,’ ‘Close to the Edge,’ and ‘Pass the Peace,’ The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow delivered a variety of insightful, optimistic songs as each band member took the lead to tell their story.

Telling jokes, improvising, and revealing some inspiration behind their songs, it is easy to see their breezy camaraderie as they make the most out of Club Passim’s intimate stage.  Dressed casually in jeans and distinctive hats (one band member in a signed tank top), their music travels an eclectic emotional spectrum, from acoustic to electric with lyric-heavy compositions tinged in rock, reggae, roots, country, and blues.  Passersby outside peaked into Club Passim’s lower level concert space as the band performed for an enthusiastic crowd.

The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow band

Whiskey Treaty Roadshow – Billy Keane, David Tanklefsky, Tory Hanna, Greg Smith, and Chris Merenda Photo courtesy of Whiskey Treaty Roadshow

Though The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow has an easygoing vibe, they have been hard at work having just released a new album and are currently on a national tour.  They also boast a Berkshire-based, award-winning short documentary, Whiskey Treaty Roadshow:  Of Brotherhood, Music, and Fine Spirits that can be found here.

After a few encores, Whiskey Treaty Roadshow’s Billy Keane playfully sung an uplifting love song, Leave Your Light On with lyrics such as “If you admit I try and damn, look how much I’ve done/And my love for you is strong, look at the lengths in which I’ve gone,” a fitting end for a band that you should leave your light on for in the future.

This memorable, fun evening marks my first time concert experience at Club Passim, 47 Palmer Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts.  Convenient to the Harvard Square T stop, Club Passim features daily live concerts from promising to professional artists with some hailing from Passim School of Music.  Concerts are situated with table seating with their own restaurant serving appetizers, sandwiches, and more.  Click here for more about Passim and all the venue has to offer.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

‘Boston Radio for Zumix’ benefit boasted Boston DJ’s dancing, live performances, and a peek inside the radio studio

Zumix Radio DJs

Photo courtesy of Zumix

Just across the East Boston fire station sits a youth haven for music and much more.  Zumix, East Boston’s non-profit organization geared toward empowering youth through music, has to offer.  On Friday, June 8, music lovers united to celebrate Zumix’s 11th annual benefit, ‘Boston Radio for Zumix’ featured a long list of Boston DJ’s past and present, live performances, silent auction, food, refreshments, and much more.  Hosted by Morning Guy Tai and Adam Klein, this sensational benefit will be held at Zumix, 260 Sumner Street in East Boston.  Click here to learn more about opportunities at Zumix.

Zumix Tune in

Courtesy of Zumix

As a hanging portrait of a boom box perches overhead, announcers and Zumix staff took the stage as they broadcast live on their local youth inspired radio 94.9 FM Zumix.  The evening had many humorous and heartfelt moments as members performed excerpts from their comedic shows, music, and an excerpt from their local Wednesday noon news program, ‘What’s Up Eastie’ featuring a person recounting their experience of the devastation in Mexico City in 2017 from a massive earthquake.  Zumix features all kind of music, comedy, and real life stories translated into radio. Zumix also offers a Sprouts program for the younger generation.   Zumix students, some who have performed with Sting, have gone on to do great things, keeping music in their lives.

 

 

Marcus Evans, a member of Zumix, offered tours of the facility which boasted soundproof rooms, impressive digital equipment, music instruments, a radio station tour by DJ Psychedelic, and a particular highlight, a unique purple room named after Prince.  Plenty of food and refreshments were served including Bart’s ice cream (Try flavors Three Geeks and a Red Head or the ever popular Deep Purple Cow).  Zumix’s silent auction items included Sporty Spice featuring Red Sox tickets and a tour of the broadcast booth, Pirates of the Boston Harbor featuring Rum Tasting for 25 people as well as a cruise on the Spirit of Boston, VIP Experience which offers a VIP experience to a Blue Hills Bank Pavilion show, Eastie’s Finest featuring a sunset sail and dinner, Soup Guy featuring tickets to the Joel McHale Show at the Chavelier Theatre in Medford, 90’s Utopia featuring tickets to the Cowboy Junkies, DJ for a Day, The Tables Have Turned offering a Turntable, Daft Punk, and Vinyl Box set, and Mid Life Crisis featuring an autographed DVD from Alice Cooper, a variety of music lessons, and more.  DJ Nomadix included the night with music and dancing before announcing the silent auction’s big winners.

 

 

Having started as a songwriting program, Zumix students enjoy in-school and after school events throughout the year. Songwriting, radio, audio technology, and performance are among the renowned programs offered by Zumix for youth ages seven through eighteen and over 1,000 students attend classes. Click here for more information on their upcoming concerts, events, and festivals! Follow Zumix on Facebook and Twitter.

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The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow’s David Tanklefsky talks songwriting and Passim’s campfire.festival

David Tanklefsky of the band Whiskey Treaty Roadshow is just one in a wide array of dynamic musicians making their way to Club Passim in Cambridge, Massachusetts for the 19th annual Memorial Day campfire.festival from Friday, May 26 through Sunday, May 29.  An interactive music festival presented “in the round,” featured artists interact with each other and the crowd, often improvising and exchanging songs during the weekend.  What often results is the unexpected.  Click here for the full list of featured musicians and for tickets.

The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow’s David Tanklefsky talks about Whiskey’s unique songwriting, the Beatles, and their touring adventures.  Click here to see their award-winning, short documentary and follow them on Facebook.

Sleepless Critic:  You’ll be at Club Passim for the campfire.festival Memorial Day weekend before the Whiskey Treaty Roadshow will make an appearance at Club Passim on Friday, July 14.  You’ve played the venue as well as campfire.festival before.  I understand it is quite an improvisational, interactive music experience.

David Tanklefsky:  I’ve done campfire a few times. This will be my first time playing there with my friend Hayley Sabella, who is terrific. Passim is a special place and we are lucky to have it in the area.  It seems like as less money is available to go around in the music world, the relationship between musicians and venues has become more of transaction.  Passim is the opposite. They are unique and truly care about developing musicians and giving them a platform for being heard.

SC:  How did the Whiskey Treaty Roadshow form and how did you meet?

DT:  Tory Hanna is really the conduit through which the band came together.  One of my best friends, who I was in a band with for years growing up, was living in a loft in Brooklyn with Tory and we started hanging out through him.  His wife Susie went to high school with Greg Smith and Tory knew Billy Keane through the Berkshires music world.  Billy had played a few shows with Chris Merenda and was a big fan of his old band, The Mammals. It happened very naturally, which I think is the best way for creative groups to get together.

The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow

The Whiskey Treaty Roadshow on tour Photo courtesy of Tim Bradley

SC:  Whose idea was the award-winning, short documentary and how did you decide on the details to the documentary?  It features lots of scenic, peaceful views of different areas of Massachusetts.

DT:  Tory grew up with a filmmaker named Tim Bradley who was looking for a new documentary project.  Tim captured our rehearsals for a four night tour we had organized through Massachusetts.  It was our first time playing together as a group.

Watching it now is such fun because it’s a snapshot of a band just starting out without any expectations beyond playing four great shows.  Tim meticulously planned out all the locations and the amazing videography.  When Tory mentioned his friend wanted to film us, I trusted his judgment but never imagined Tim would come up with such a well-crafted film.  It really helped catapult us into being a real band.

SC:  You have a relaxed sound, a rhythm likened to a drive down a peaceful country road.  You have a bit of a country tinge to some of your music.  Was that planned?  How did you end up conforming to a sound?

DT:  In folk music, there are songs and chord progressions that become seared into your soul over time. We’ve never had a discussion about it, but everyone brings songs to the table that we think will work with our instrumentation and vocal abilities. I think the folk/country/Americana textures come from having many stringed instruments on stage and the collaborative spirit of just sitting around, passing the guitar, and sharing songs.

SC:  Folk music is full of rich stories and each of you has a distinct style.  How do you come up with your songs?  Do you write a song together or are the songs bits of each songwriter or one song written by one another?

DT:  In this project, everyone writes independently and then brings songs to the table in various forms of completeness. We’ve been tinkering with different instrumentation and having some songs with more minimal arrangements as it has evolved.  We ask ourselves, ‘Do we need five people strumming away like mad men through this whole song?’  Often the answer is no. In the next few months, we’re planning to do a little songwriting retreat where we write more actively together for the first time, which will be new, exciting, and hopefully fruitful.

SC:  Where did your love for songwriting start?  Your particular songwriting style has a bit of humor with some rich lyrics and a bit of an unpredictable tempo at times.

DT:  When I was 10, I had an unhealthy obsession with the for three years straight.  I thought they were a perfect band.  My friends and I went as the Beatles for Halloween every year between ages 10 and 13. No one wanted to be Ringo and no one was left-handed like Paul so we were four kids with mushroom cuts and right-handed cardboard guitars.

Later I became inspired by songwriters that are always growing, pushing, and challenging their listeners.  I think Paul Simon is the gold standard for that.  I’m in awe of the insatiable curiosity he taps into and I try to write from a position of newness like that.  Being unaware of where my curiosity will take me but trying to just follow it through.

SC:  I understand you are touring.  What kind of venue would be an ideal place for you to play?

DT:  It was a huge thrill to perform with Woody Guthrie’s granddaughter Sarah Lee. That’s way up on the list.

We’ve had the opportunity to play some amazing old theatres over the last year or so. We loved the Academy of Music in Northampton and the Colonial Theatre in Pittsfield.  It was total thrill to sell out Mass MOCA, but some of our best shows have been in how-did-we-end-up-here type places too.

We played a last minute show in Cambridge in March at a really tiny place in Central Square and it was packed in with people standing on tables, total chaos.  The bouncer was adamant that no one else could come in because it was too packed.  One person left outside was our drummer, Jimmy.  He came in the back door and was kicked back out onto the street. We said, ‘But that’s the drummer!’  The bouncer replied, ‘I don’t care, I said no more!’  Eventually we brokered a deal and Jimmy was allowed inside and the show went on.  Theatre and dive bar are both okay in our book.

SC:  What are the Whiskey Treaty Roadshow’s future plans?

DT:  Our new EP is almost done and we are in high-level band discussions about a run of shows in the fall to support its release. We did it with an awesome engineer named Marc Seedorf at Barnhouse Studios in Chicopee, Massachusetts. We had to take a month break from recording because he was on tour with Dinosaur Jr. as their guitar tech and he got to play a few songs each night with them.  He’s our new hero.

Click here for more information and tickets to Passim’s campfire.festival at Club Passim, 47 Palmer Street in Cambridge, Massachusetts, conveniently located in Harvard Square.  Not only a haven for music lessons, Passim offers live concerts nearly 365 days a year featuring Grammy winners to musicians with a dream.  Click here for their music schedule and follow Passim on Facebook and Twitter.

Zumix will celebrate 25th anniversary on grand scale with ‘Boston DJs with Zumix’ benefit

Music lovers unite!  Zumix, East Boston’s non-profit organization geared toward empowering youth through music, has saved the best for last.  Featuring 20 Boston DJs past and present, live performances, special guest sets, silent auction, and much more, Zumix brings their 25th anniversary year to a grand close with ‘Boston DJs for Zumix’ on Friday, March 31 at 8 p.m.  This sensational benefit will be held at Zumix, 260 Sumner Street, East Boston, Massachusetts.  Click here for tickets and more information.

Zumix radio

New radio station 94.9 FM Zumix Radio Photo courtesy of Zumix

After streaming online for 10 years, the evening benefit will also celebrate their new, growing community station, 94.9 FM Zumix, a station that serves a bilingual audience and features a wide range of programming.  All proceeds of ‘Boston DJs for Zumix’ support Zumix’s dynamic, free teen music programs in songwriting, community radio, creative technology, instrument instruction, and performance.  Click here to make a donation.

zumix radio

Youth DJ on the mic Photo courtesy of Zumix

The featured DJs are as follows:  Adam 12, Akrobatik, Baltazar, DJ Bean, Jim Braude, Julie Devereaux, Fast Freddy, Mike Gioscia, Lori Grande, Merilee Kelly, George Knight, Carolyn Kruse, John Laurenti, Dana Marshall, Jess Phaneuf, Matt Phipps, Morning Guy Tai, Nancy Quill, Neal Robert, Nomadik, and Zumix DJs.

Zumix White House

Zumix accepting an award from Michelle Obama Photo courtesy of Zumix

Winner of the National Arts and Humanities Youth Programs Award from the White House and providing music lessons and other technology to lower income families, Zumix’s mission is to empower youth to express themselves through music and make positive changes throughout their community and the world.  At first started as a songwriting program, Zumix students enjoy in-school and after school events throughout the year. Songwriting, radio, audio technology, and performance are among the renowned programs offered by Zumix for youth ages 7 through 18 and over 1,000 students attend classes.

Zumix Walk for Music

Annual Walk for Music community event Photo courtesy of Zumix

For tickets to ‘Boston DJs for Zumix,’ click here or call (617) 568-9777.  Click here for more information on their upcoming concerts, events, and festivals. Follow Zumix on Facebook and Twitter.