REVIEW:  SpeakEasy Stage Company’s searing and immersive ‘People, Places & Things’ makes an indelible impact

Nina is in a nightmare.

Perhaps rock bottom is an unimaginable state until you learn how much further you can sink. People, Places & Things is a jarring and astounding portrait of a spiraling woman who must face that this nightmare she’s in can be stopped.

Masterfully directed  by David R. Gammons, SpeakEasy Stage Company presents Duncan Macmillan’s People, Places, & Things live and in person at the Calderwood Pavilion in Boston, Massachusetts through Saturday, March 5.  This show contains mature themes.  Click here for more information and tickets.

People, Places, and Things is immediately gripping as it thrusts the audience into Nina’s (or whatever she calls herself at the moment) apparent breakdown onstage.  Nina, brilliantly depicted by Marianna Bassham, is a struggling actress who has more than just forgotten her lines during a pivotal moment in a sophisticated play.  The harried and frantic nature of Nina’s life emanates from the stage and you are engulfed in the deep chasm of an addict.

Kadahj Bennett and Marianna Bassham in People, Places & Things. Photo by Nile Scott Studios.

While People, Places & Things has its share of harrowing moments, it is not without its doses of dark humor. It is a realistic depiction of an addict’s complex journey with its own share of twists, turns, and shocking revelations.  Bassham is enigmatic and at times dreadfully unlikable in the way a guarded person who thinks they have all the answers might be.  Her sporadic tics, vacant expression, shaking, low talking, and absent pauses are shocking yet enthralling to witness.  Bassham’s disillusionment of the world gives the impression that she feels she is not in the chaos of her circumstances, but standing outside of them in her own judgment.  With alarm, rage, and confusion flickering in her eyes, Bassham is absolutely riveting.

Adrianne Krstansky and Marianna Bassham in People, Places & Things. Photo by Anabel Rios Photography.

 The show depicts a mix of lucid moments and unhinged visions manifested in part by the efforts of Jeff Adelberg’s transient lighting varying from creepy to downright alarming. Whether it is to demonstrate time freezing, time progression or revealing trauma with occasional strobe lights, Adelberg captures the striking and vivid chaos within and outside this woman.

Marianna Bassham and the cast of People, Places & Things. Photo by Nile Scott Studios.

Jeff Petersen’s open staging is a bold and clever choice where nothing is hidden from the front of the stage right through to what seems like dressing rooms.  This quick-paced production makes some swift transitions meticulously done with purpose and meaning.  The transparency lends a great deal to the piece as each character struggles with what they are hiding.

Marianna Bassham and Nael Nacer in People, Places & Things. Photo by Nile Scott Studios.

 The dynamic cast includes members that take on dual or even multiple roles that are vastly different throughout the production. Kadahj Bennett’s direct, compassionate, and occasionally amusing turn as Foster is as harsh on Bassham as he has probably been on himself.  Bennett, Bassam, and barely stable and complicated Nael Nacer as Mark share some significant and transcending moments as their outlooks on life make for some compelling dialogue.   Nacer and Bassham also share some intriguing chemistry.  At one point, Naser refers to Bassam as a ‘human hand grenade.’  Adrienne Krstansky and John Kuntz make some brilliant transitions in their multiple roles and it is easy to become invested in each of these unpredictable characters.

Nael Nacer, John Kuntz, and Marianna Bassham in People, Places & Things. Photo by Nile Scott Studios.

SpeakEasy Stage Company presents Duncan Macmillan’s People, Places, & Things live and in person at the Calderwood Pavilion in Boston, Massachusetts through Saturday, March 5.  This show contains mature themes.  Click here for more information, tickets, and upcoming productions.

REVIEW: South Shore Conservatory presents fascinating art exhibition, ‘South Shore Photographers’ through April 30

No matter how talented an artist is, there is nothing like discovery and opportunity.  South Shore Conservatory is dedicated to mold and provide opportunity for promising talent in the arts through their classes, workshops, and exhibits.  Click here for further insight into the South Shore Conservatory with two locations in Hingham and Duxbury, Massachusetts.

Curated by Judith Montminy, South Shore Conservatory and South Shore Art Center offered an opening reception for an insightful exhibition featuring 44 South Shore Photographers’ inspirational works of art on Thursday, March 23 at 6 p.m.  Visit South Shore Photographers exhibit through Sunday, April 30 at South Shore Art Center.

SS Conservatory Opening Reception and exhibition

‘South Shore Photographers’ feature 44 artists on two floors Photo courtesy of South Shore Art Center

Linked by a regal wooden staircase, The South Shore Art Center is brimming with carefully selected framed pieces on two floors.  Delicious free food and wine were available for guests at the reception as they carefully perused bright colors and abstract pieces.  Other pieces portrayed water and people.

SS Conservatory Art Gallery 2

Part of the exhibit for ‘South Shore Photographers’ Photo courtesy of Michelle McGrath

Soft landscapes, bright, sparkling water, snow steeped winter scenes, colorful highways, emerald green wooded views, and a pair of Bengal tigers is just a taste of what these deeply observant photographers offer in this ongoing exhibition.  Convinced that one portrait will be a perfect fit to take home?  Each framed photo is on sale.

Keri McAndrews Trees in Fog at exhibition

Guests gather at ‘South Shore Photographers’ opening reception and ponder ‘Trees in Fog’ by Keri McAndrews Photo courtesy of Keri McAndrews

South Shore Art Center presents South Shore Photographers exhibition through Sunday, April 30 at South Shore Conservatory, One Conservatory Drive in Hingham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information, how to donate, and the full calendar of upcoming events.  Follow South Shore Art Center on Facebook.