REVIEW: Boston Ballet’s idyllic ‘Cinderella’ more than a glittering gown and glass slippers

Be like Cinderella.

During Sir Frederick Ashton’s Cinderella, The Prince, portrayed masterfully by Patrick Yocum, gentlemanly gestures for Cinderella to go first as they make their entrance and she in turn motions for him to go first.  It is a subtle gesture, but holds great significance.  It is just one moment in many that this Cinderella exudes pure selflessness, more so than other adaptations. We can all learn from Cinderella.  She’ll make a lasting impression and is a shining example of what every child should strive to become.

Sir Frederick Ashton’s Cinderella, performed by the Boston Ballet, continues through Saturday, June 8 at the Citizens Bank Boston Opera House.  Click here for more information and for tickets.  Click here for a closer look at the production.

The Boston Ballet’s Cinderella is an ethereal, lighthearted tale, told with a richness that far exceeds a glittering gown and glass slippers.  David Walker’s multi-layered, translucent scenic design and elaborate costumes create moving portraits from deep into an enchanted forest to a sophisticated royal ball.

It is a classic fairy tale about a young girl living with her father and two ugly Stepsisters.  When a mysterious woman shows up on their doorstep, it may change Cinderella’s life forever.  This adaptation has the earmarks of the popular fairy tale including the pumpkin, the royal ball, fairy godmother, and the handsome prince.

Jeffrey Cirio and Misa Kuranaga in Ashton's Cinderella ©Gene Schiavone

Misa Kuranaga and Jeffrey Cirio in Sir Frederick Ashton’s Cinderella; photo by Gene Schiavone, courtesy of Boston Ballet

Sir Frederick Ashton’s Cinderella also contains a few slight alternations from other popular adaptations and it is all the better for it starting with Vikorina Kapitonova’s marvelous portrayal as Cinderella.  Even in a soot-covered, flowing costume, Kapitonova’s glowing face shines through as she jaunts around the house, with only a broom as her companion.  She soaks in her surroundings, her exuberance shown through the simplest of things.  She puts joy in every step, rarely showing any despair in her strength, warmth, and innocent smile.  Cinderella may be neglected, but she’s also happy and imaginative, despite her circumstances.

Absent is the anguish and vindictiveness Cinderella endured from the glaring presence of a Stepmother in other retellings, but instead a harried father tending to the constant needs of two trying Stepsisters.  What makes this Cinderella so remarkable is she is not bullied by her Stepsisters, but that much more selfless, doing everything for the ease of others, always putting others first with a smile.  She tends to her Stepsisters needs out of love, a self-absorbed pair of braying bookends, portrayed with awkward, conceited flair by Roddy Doble and John Lam.  In full bonnets and mismatched, heavily adorned attire, the Stepsisters comically parade in their gaudy and audacious glory, unaware of how foolish they seem.

Sir Frederick Ashton’s Cinderella’s choreography is an elegant display.  The Fairy Godmother makes a grand, magical entrance and is soon accompanied by the colorful Fairies of the Four Seasons.  They each have their moment to shine, their beautiful solos reflecting their distinct personalities on lush green and then under silvery trees.

Misa Kuranaga and Jeffrey Cirio in Ashton's Cinderella ©Gene Schiavone

 

In white and blue, Patrick Yocum, who was also impressive in Boston Ballet’s Full on Forsythe, makes a wonderful Prince, leading Kapitonova to a delicate pas de deux. Their sweet chemistry is apparent as Cinderella makes her own grand entrance.  Another captivating dance occurs at the ball as the clock strikes midnight, the dancers intricately posing in that pivotal moment knowing the best is soon to come.

Boston Ballet 'The Warm Up'

One of the interactive stations at Boston Ballet’s ‘The Warm Up’ Photo by Jeanne Denizard

Mikko Nissinen’s Boston Ballet continues to offer a number of interactive stations including Fairy tale Fun and a photo-friendly display to learn more about the show and ballet through The Warm Up located in the lower lobby.

Sir Frederick Ashton’s Cinderella, performed by the Boston Ballet, continues through Saturday, June 8 at the Citizen’s Bank Boston Opera House, 539 Washington Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Save 50% for youth under 17 after purchasing one full price ticket.  Click here for more information, tickets, and for future events and more, follow Boston Ballet on Facebook and Twitter.