Take a look at Company Theatre’s new logo as co-founder Zoe Bradford discusses the Company Theatre’s exciting future

The Company Theatre is kicking off 2020 with a new look.

Not only are they starting a fun-filled new season that includes The Who’s Tommy, Bring it On, Rock of Ages, and Fun Home, but they recently unveiled their new logo.  Click here to see their new logo.

Sleepless Critic had a chance to interview Zoe Bradford about the Company Theatre’s upcoming projects, their vision for the future, and even walked away with some good advice.  Click here for the full list the Company Theatre’s 2020 season.

Company Theatre co-founders Jordie Saucerman and Zoe Bradford

Company Theatre co-founders Jordie Saucerman and Zoe Bradford, courtesy of Company Theatre

Sleepless Critic:  Congratulations on Company Theatre’s recent 40th anniversary. So much has happened in the last few years from the upgraded, painted theatre with new seating to new, original productions.  Please tell me more about that.

Zoe Bradford:  Now that the theatre is beautiful, we’re envisioning the potential of our outdoor property.  We’ve done a lot with Academy of the Company Theatre (A.C.T.) with an expanded outdoor stage and new pavilion.  We have a growing summer program that has been at full capacity.   Not only do we need more space and with everybody addicted to their screens, I believe in getting kids outside.  We have a path to the pond front and we’ve held classes there for water coloring and creative writing.

ACT summer program

A group of past A.C.T. students Photo courtesy of The Company Theatre

Freedom for creative expression has been the key for me, so I know it is the key for them.  It’s why I desperately wanted my own theatre and thank God it happened.  It’s not stimulating to work in the confines of another person’s building or organization.  That’s one of the draws here.

SC:  You once said you chose popular shows that sell, but in the last few years, The Company Theatre has been delving into uncharted waters a bit with musicals such as Carrie the Musical, Lizzie Borden, and American Idiot.

ZB:  It’s financially difficult to do that, but we are trying to give the young people what they want.  Lizzie Borden went well because people love local history and some said they have been to her house.  It’s a gruesome tale, but it was also a nice psychological thriller.

We changed how we choose our shows a little, but we still have to please our general audience and offer something for the family, something mature, and our team knows their demographic well and what will be successful.

I’m passionate about big musicals and there’s nothing like the thrill of a live orchestra.  People in the professional theatre world, mentors, and colleagues say they will put eight pieces in here and do a lot of synthetic and prerecord.  You can make a lot of money that way, but we can’t do that.  Michael Joseph said that is standard while he was here and we’ve maintained it.

SC:  What shows do you still dream of doing?

ZB:  I’d love to do WickedThe Hunchback of Notre Dame, and I’m also waiting to do Mamma Mia!  We’ll get to it.  It’s all about rights and I’m sure there are new shows coming out that I’d love to get my hands on.

As a non-profit, whatever comes in has to support what we are doing and help us be self-sustaining.  Grants, gifts, and tax deductible donations are the key.  We have better opportunities for community support such as new packages for corporate sponsorship due to having higher end computer capabilities, a better website, and a ticketing service that allows people who wish to support us to advertise.

SC:  What has been your most challenging musical?

ZB:  The Wizard of Oz because the movie is a masterpiece and any derivation from the film would be a disappointment for those who truly love it.  People would fight me on that, but if you take on The Wiz, you can do what you want because no one has a preset notion of it.

The Company Theatre The Wiz auditions

Company Theatre’s ‘The Wiz’ auditions will be held on January 22. Photo courtesy of the Company Theatre

SC: The Wiz is also part of Company Theatre’s 2020 season.  What advice would you give someone taking on a business in theatre or similar?

ZB:  It’s highly competitive.  Know your vision, don’t give up, and try to think of something that someone else hasn’t already thought of.  Be fresh and original when you can and make sure people know of your existence without being obnoxious about it.  We still struggle with it.  Some people say they didn’t know a theatre is here.

SC:  What do you envision for the Company Theatre’s future?

ZB:  We have to keep growing and we set up the Legacy Fund.  Our money rolls in and out with the tide as any non-profit would, but we’re actively fundraising to ensure another 40 years and beyond.

For over ten years, I’ve wanted to design a new logo.  I remember sitting at a little drafting table back in the 70s and hand drew it when we didn’t have any money or resources.

With art being cut in classrooms and attending theatre in Boston can be so expensive, we’re looking to keep this going so it’s accessible for everyone and expand.  I can see us taking on more property and A.C.T. quadrupling over the next ten years.  We’re not a community theatre anymore, but a year round professional and we’ll evolve again.  We provide many jobs for people, but the other part of my vision is to create more jobs for artisans in the area.  The more people that are working and inspiring people, the better.

Company Theatre's The Who's Tommy

Photo courtesy of the Company Theatre

The Company Theatre kicks off their 2020 season with A.C.T’s The Who’s Tommy from January 17 through January 26.  Click here for tickets and here for more on Company Theatre’s 2020 season.  You can also get tickets by calling the box office at 781-871-2787.  Located at 30 Accord Park Drive in Norwell, Massachusetts, click here for how to support the Company Theatre and be sure to follow them on FacebookTwitter, and Instagram.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

 

REVIEW: Poignant yet hopeful, Renee Zellweger’s star rises as ‘Judy’

Renee Zellweger has some experience as the underdog.  Before she portrayed Bridget Jones, the iconic character from the beloved Helen Fielding book, Bridget Jones’s Diaryreaders didn’t think she was the right fit for the film.  Renee isn’t British and she’s more glamorous than people imagined Bridget to be in the books.  Kate Winslet, Minnie Driver, and Rachel Weisz were among the British actresses considered for the role.

However, Renee Zellweger embodied Bridget Jones and although she ultimately won an Oscar for Ruby in the indie film Cold Mountain, Bridget became her most recognized role and she continues her role as Bridget in two film sequels.

I hadn’t established an opinion over whether she could portray Bridget Jones, having not read the books until after seeing the film.  However, I was among the doubters she could pull off Judy Garland in Judy, now playing in theatres.  Click here for more information and show times.

After seeing Judy Davis portray Judy Garland in the 2001 television mini-series, Life of Judy Garland: Me and My Shadows in which Judy Davis handily won an Emmy, it was difficult to imagine anyone else doing Judy that much justice.  However, Renee takes on Judy with surprising depth as a fading superstar who needs the prowess to gain back her former success.

Directed by Rupert Goold, Judy is a snapshot into the latter part of Judy Garland’s life.  She’s a woman hitting rock bottom as her dwindling finances make it difficult to support her children with an ex-husband weary of her less than stable lifestyle.  She is also an incomparable talent reaching for her former glory, despite the demons that have haunted her since childhood.

Judy Garland is also a bit of an underdog.  Legendary MGM studio producer Louis B. Mayer told Judy that there are prettier girls, thinner girls, and more glamorous girls, but Judy’s distinctive vocals set her apart from everyone else.

Renee is not unrecognizable as Judy as certain inflections still hint of Renee.  It is not a Judy Garland impression, though the makeup artists do a wonderful job of pouring Renee into Judy’s distinctive look.  Renee delivers a powerful, multi-faceted performance, singing every song in the film without lip syncing, especially in a lighter performance of Come Rain or Come Shine.  Her vocals may not be as extraordinary as Judy Garland’s, but she does capture her voice is a different way.   Renee depicts her prideful desperation with cynical humor, charm, and the loneliness Judy must have felt during this tumultuous time.

The film can be a little slow at times, but Renee is the reason for seeing this film.  Judy also has its poignant, tragic moments, but it is a loving tribute to a woman and her eternal search for happiness, despite the odds.

REVIEW: ‘Star Wars: A New Hope in Concert’ with live orchestration from the Boston Pops a thrilling cinematic achievement

No better way to witness a galaxy far, far away.

It has become a beloved Boston Pops tradition to exhibit the finest films in cinema history enhanced by the stellar sounds of the Boston Pops, an immersive film experience performed so eloquently, one may never watch the film quite the same way again.  In the past few years, The Boston Pops has inventively breathed new life into film classics such as ‘The Wizard of Oz,’ ‘West Side Story,’ ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’ ‘Psycho,’ ‘Home Alone,’ ‘Raiders of the Lost Ark,’ and ‘Nosferatu‘ through stunning live orchestration and Star Wars lives up to that sterling reputation.

The re-mastered, extended version of ‘Star Wars: A New Hope in Concert‘ with live orchestration by the Boston Pops was held at Symphony Hall earlier this spring and then recently in the Koussevitzky Music Shed at the Tanglewood in Lenox, MA on August 16.  The ninth film and epic conclusion of the Star Wars series, ‘Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker‘ arrives in theatres in December and what better way to welcome the end than by remembering the beginning.

John Williams at Tanglewood (Hilary Scott)

John Williams conducting Film Night at Tanglewood Photo credit to Hilary Scott

Academy award-winning composer John Williams has been the name on everyone’s lips at Tanglewood for the past couple of weeks with ‘Star Wars: A New Hope in Concert‘ on Friday, August 16 and then the ever-popular ‘Film Night’ on August 24, an annual tribute concert featuring just a few of the acclaimed film scores of John Williams.  Not only did John Williams make an appearance at the end of the August 16th performance, but Patriots owner Robert Kraft was also in the audience.  Click here for more information, tickets, and a look at Tanglewood’s full schedule.

Keith Lockhart Leads the Boston Pops at Tanglewood (Hilary Scott)

Keith Lockhart leads the Boston Pops at Tanglewood Photo courtesy of Hilary Scott

Conducted by acclaimed Boston Pops conductor Keith Lockhart, The Boston Pops launched an enthusiastic audience into that beloved galaxy with ‘Star Wars: Episode IV A New Hope,’ the first film in what would become a beloved series of films in 1977.  The rising swell of the perilous, suspenseful, triumphant, and Academy award-winning Star Wars Main Theme from John Williams was just the start of this exciting film that has been thought to be a touchstone to future films in that genre while also possessing some classic Shakespearean roots.

The intense score, each crisp note from the orchestra, the sound that thundered in the Koussevitzky Shed was nothing that can be relived in front of a television screen or in a movie theatre.  It felt like being in the studio with the cast, enhancing their already outstanding performances, and scoring the film for the first time.

Star Wars A New Hope

Mark Hamill as Luke Skywalker, Carrie Fisher as Princess Leia, and Harrison Ford as Han Solo in ‘Star Wars: A New Hope’ Photo credit to Disney/Lucasfilm

The lively audience was clearly composed of some of the most devoted Star Wars fans cheering   not only the opening of the film, but each major character as they were first introduced onscreen.  Familiar faces such as the twinkling eyes and swaggering charisma of Harrison Ford’s Han Solo, Peter Mayhew’s towering presence as Chewbacca, Carrie Fisher’s holographic appearance as Princess Leia as she utters the classic line, “Help me, Obi-Wan Kenobi.  You’re my Only Hope,” Alec Guinness as the wise and mysterious Obi-Wan Kenobi, Mark Hamill’s naïve Luke Skywalker, and James Earl Jones as the timeless voice of Darth Vader were all greeted with rousing applause.

Set on the planet with two suns, the subtle humor, the scheming, the epic adventure, George Lucas’s marvelous characters, the dazzling technology of its time, the bickering between R2-D2 and C-3PO and between Han Solo and Princess Leia are all recaptured in this unforgettable cinematic experience.

The Lawn at Tanglewood 2016 (Hilary Scott)

The Lawn at Tanglewood 2016 Photo credit to Hilary Scott

Located in the Berkshires at 297 West Street in Lenox, Massachusetts and now year-round, Tanglewood’s outdoor venue is a must see, whether under the tent at Koussevitzky Shed or under the stars for a lawn picnic.  Click here for Tanglewood’s full schedule follow them on Facebook.

REVIEW: Bridgewater State University’s Family Performing Arts Center’s lighter ‘The Wizard of Oz’ inventive fun for the whole family

A group of Nelson Mandela Fellows and visitors from China we among the enthusiastic audience attending Bridgewater State University’s (BSU) Family Performing Arts Center’s ‘The Wizard of Oz.’  Featuring full versions of ‘The Wizard of Oz’s’ beloved soundtrack such as Somewhere over the Rainbow and If I Only Had a Brain, this ‘Wizard of Oz’ is a bright, inventive look at a sweet Kansas farm girl and her dog who find themselves in a strange land with no idea how to get home and a witch suddenly in their wake.

Family Performing Arts Center presents ‘The Wizard of Oz’ through Sunday, July 28 at Bridgewater State University’s Rondileau Campus Center Auditorium in Bridgewater, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and for tickets.  Click here for a closer look at the production.  Save 10% when you use the code ‘BRAIN’ at online checkout.  This show is suitable for all ages.

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Mary Kate McDonald as Dorothy Gale and her dog Toto Costumes by Mary Hurd and Photo credit to Deidre Confrare/BSU’s Family Performing Arts Center

From the moment Mary Kate McDonald as Dorothy, in braids and blue gingham overalls, vocally glides through the full version of Harold Arlen’s Somewhere Over the Rainbow which includes the song’s lesser known introduction, it was clear this show was going to be something special.  A beautiful soprano, McDonald is adorable as spunky Dorothy, depicting her with curiosity and a determined spirit, but careful not to let her impulsiveness get the better of her.  Her interaction with Toto, portrayed and operated by an ensemble character, gives Toto dimension.  Though at first it was disappointing Toto wasn’t a live dog, it ended up being a clever touch.  The human expressions and movements make Toto that much more endearing.

Featuring a couple of songs and a few characters not included in the 1939 film and a subtle twist ending, BSU’s Family Performing Arts Center keeps this production with its share of freshness and surprises.  With orchestration by Larry Wilcox and Peter Howard and background music by Herbert Stothart, ‘The Wizard of Oz’s’ enchanting soundtrack is no joke, as rarely heard and welcome introductions are weaved into each familiar number.  Conducted by Eli Bigelow, the orchestra impressively sets the mood to each comical and exciting scene.  Though the Jitterbug number is not included in the 1939 film and seems a bit dated and silly, the kids will certainly enjoy the darkly comedic piece.

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A Kansas landscape Costumes by Mary Hurd and Photo credit to Deidre Confrare/ BSU’s Family Performing Arts Center

‘The Wizard of Oz’ also boasts unique choreography, rich lighting, and picturesque sets.  For example, the yellow brick road is cleverly demonstrated more through props and choreography than a literal road.  Another notable moment is the intriguing choreography used during the poppies scene enhanced by bright, hand painted sets by Maia Hay and Michael Duarte.  Christopher Scully’s brilliant lighting and Michael Duarte’s sets portray rich silhouettes of the Kansas landscape and Oz which can dazzling or frightening.

This production has a few more comical moments to keep the show a bit lighter, but does not take away from the show’s poignancy and excitement.  It was a surprise to discover Haley McKenney as Glinda and Aunt Em.  McKenney could not have portrayed the two characters more differently.  Decked out in a feathered stole and shimmering tiara, McKenney’s vivacious Glinda is a high energy diva, chipper-voiced and almost maniacally giggly while the plainly stoic Aunt Em is a practical, but the nonetheless a compassionate soul.

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In a winged black hat, Katia Greene’s unpredictable Wicked Witch has her wicked moments, but portrayed a bit more comically with a spin on the character that I’ve never considered.  Greene clearly relishes the role, delivering an energetic and intimidating performance.  Neha Groves captures the mysterious, well meaning, but somewhat bombastic Professor Marvel.

However, Christopher Starr is an expert tumbler and his pliable body and good-natured demeanor make him a wonderful Scarecrow.  Steven Sawan as Tinman and Jim Quinn as Cowardly Lion both give endearing, comical performances.  Quinn’s baritone and quick wit make the number, If I Were King of the Forest a lot of fun.  With McDonald as Dorothy, they develop a lasting, captivating camaraderie that ring especially true during the numbers We’re Off to See the Wizard, The Merry Old Land of Oz, and Lions and Tigers and Bears.

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Christopher Starr as Scarecrow, Steven Sawan as Tinman, Mary Kate McDonald as Dorothy, and Jim Quinn as Cowardly Lion. Costumes by Mary Hurd and Photo credits to Deidre Confrare/BSU’s Family Performing Arts Center

Take a trip down the yellow brick road with BSU’s Family Performing Arts Center’s production of ‘The Wizard of Oz’ continuing through July 28 at Rondileau Campus Center Auditorium, 19 Park Avenue in Bridgewater, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and for tickets.  Save 10% when you use the code ‘BRAIN’ at online checkout.   Follow BSU’s Family Performing Arts Center on Facebook for future events and more.

REVIEW: From the creator of ‘Riverdale’, Flat Earth Theatre delivers a bizarre and suspenseful ‘King of Shadows’

The theme of Flat Earth Theatre’s 13th season has been a thought provoking, mind-bending journey exploring the extraordinary in Delicate Particle Logic, the mythical in Not Medea, and now the mysterious and fantastical in King of Shadows from Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa, the creator of Riverdale. This season’s unique, message-driven productions bend reality to reveal a bigger picture.

As a fan of the twist-ending, they have been nothing short of fascinating.  Directed by Michael Hisamoto, Flat Earth Theatre continues King of Shadows through June 22 at the Mosesian Center for the Arts in Watertown, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.  This show may be haunting for children.

Flat Earth Theatre King of Shadows set

The setting of Flat Earth Theatre’s ‘King of Shadows’ Photo courtesy of Flat Earth Theatre

Much like Riverdale, an ordinary setting withholds extraordinary secrets. Grounded in the reality of missing children in San Francisco, King of Shadows delves into the lives of four distinct characters, all affected by their dark past.  The haunting set and intimate, encompassing staging, especially PJ Strachman’s light design, Bram Xu’s sound design, Stage Manager/Puppeteer Amy Lehrmitt, and scenic designer Ryan Bates, create an immersive, unsettling atmosphere for what is about to unfold.

Compassionate and ambitious Berkeley graduate student Jessica, portrayed with finesse by Laura Chowenhill, may be in over her head when she meets Nihar, a mysterious, wise-beyond-his-years homeless teenager portrayed by Trinidad Ramkissoon.  Ramkissoon’s penetrating gaze and inquisitive nature give Nihar an edgy charisma.  He has a fuzzy past, but that does not stop Jessica from her perpetual desire to help others.

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Logical and protective policeman Eric Saunders, portrayed impressively by Matt Crawford, is suspicious that Nihar may have a dangerous agenda.  Crawford’s Eric is a great foil for Chowendill’s pensive and conflicted Jessica, setting the stage for some sparks.  Jessica’s resentful and impulsive younger sister Sarah, portrayed with sarcasm and sass by Abigail Erdelatz, is capable of anything as she longs for a different life.

Flat Earth’s multi-layered production, King of Shadows is best seen without revealing too many details.  Though it’s an increasingly outlandish tale, King of Shadows has more than its share of suspense, leaving the audience constantly wondering where each character’s loyalty truly lies.

Flat Earth Theatre - King of Shadows Trinidad Ramkissoon as Nihar

Trinidad Ramkissoon as Nihar Photo courtesy of Flat Earth Theatre

Flat Earth Theatre’s final production of its 13th season, King of Shadows continues through Saturday, June 22 at the Black Box at the Mosesian Center for the Arts, 321 Arsenal Street in Watertown, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Partially surrounded by a lush green lawn that gives it a campus feel, The Mosesian Center for the Arts houses a number of productions, concerts, and exhibits during the year.  Offering free parking and next door to Panera Bread,  Earful and Gilly Assuncao are among the featured concerts this month while The Wizard of Oz and the opera, La Cenerentola, are among the upcoming theatrical productions.  Click here to see all that Mosesian Center for the Arts has to offer.

 

 

 

 

 

Company Theatre’s co-founder Zoe Bradford talks 40th anniversary, ‘Ragtime’, and the theatre’s exciting future

Underneath a tent on a bright summer day, Company Theatre’s co-founder Zoe Bradford, enthusiastic and smiling, has a lot to celebrate.  The award-winning Company Theatre is as busy as ever as they prepare to open their 40th season with beloved musical, Ragtime   July 27.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Zoe reflects on how Company Theatre has evolved over the years and her extraordinary vision for the future which goes well beyond their 2.3 acres in Norwell, Massachusetts.

Sleepless Critic:  Congratulations on Company Theatre’s 40th anniversary. Even in the last five years, so much has happened from the upgraded, painted theatre with new seating to new, original productions.  Please tell me more about that.

Zoe Bradford:  Now that the theatre is beautiful, we’re envisioning the potential of our outdoor property.  We’ve done a lot with Academy of the Company Theatre (A.C.T.) having an expanded outdoor stage and new pavilion.  Our growing summer program is currently at capacity with 200 kids.  Not only do we need more space and with everybody addicted to their screens, I believe in getting kids outside.  We now have a path to the pond front and we’re holding classes there for water coloring and creative writing.

Freedom for creative expression has been the key for me, so I know it is the key for them.  It’s why I desperately wanted my own theatre and thank God it happened.  It’s not stimulating to work in the confines of another person’s building or organization.  That’s one of the draws here.

Company Theatre's Paragon Park cast

The 2012 ‘Paragon Park’ cast, photo courtesy of Company Theatre

SC:  The original musical Paragon Park took place in 2012.  Are there any original shows you are working on?

ZB:  Michael Hammond and I loved working on Paragon Park together and we want to do another one.  We’re bookending our 40th anniversary with the start of Ragtime and ending summer to summer with a revival of Paragon Park in 2019 as opposed to the season running January to December.

Paragon Park will be the pinnacle of our 40th celebration with a wonderful night of dinner and dancing at Nantasket Beach Resort in Hull.  Preceding that will be a VIP cocktail reception where guests can go on the Carousel and ride the ponies if they wish.  Then we’ll trolley to the hotel for celebration and fundraising.

Company Theatre's original production, 'Paragon Park'

TV personality Scott Wahle with ‘Paragon Park’ cast The Company Theatre’s will reprise its original production of Paragon Park the Musical, which premiered in 2012, image by Zoe Bradford

We’ll also have an outdoor VIP cocktail reception before opening Ragtime and featuring the Model T Ford, which is integral to Ragtime’s story.  It looks like the real thing, built exactly to scale.  Bob Grazioso, who has since retired from technical director but is still active at Company Theatre, built the Model T Ford when we did the show in 2003.  The Ford Motor Company wanted to buy it from us, but we kept it because we wanted to do the show again.

Ragtime's Booker T. Washington with the Statue of Liberty

Todd McNeel Jr. of Boston as Booker T. Washington in ‘Ragtime’ Photo courtesy of Zoe Bradford

SC:  When you revive a show like Ragtime, what kind of changes do you make?

ZB:  Life happens.  My thinking has evolved from 2003 to 2018 just from life experience and I have approached Ragtime differently than I did then.  We have three actors reprising their roles and 40 cast members who all feel it is a different experience than last time.

We did Ragtime in 2003 because there are strong, underlying themes of racism in the early 1900s and our attitude was thank God this is all behind us.  Now this show has never been needed more.  Shockingly, things have gone backwards and we have to speak out.  Being a huge sympathizer of Black Lives Matter and having a black adopted daughter puts a lot of things into perspective.

Back then, immigration was sort of in the forefront of the news, but not like it is today.  The show is about immigrants, which is about America and coming to America.

My passion lies in great storytelling.  Ragtime is a prevalent, uplifting show with three beautiful, intertwining stories involving a Jewish immigrant and his daughter, a New Rochelle family, and jazz musician Colehouse Walker Jr. who buys the Model T.  It’s a moving, relatable show about family, choosing family, and acceptance.  It also has a brilliant score and we have a fifteen piece live orchestra.  In my long theatre career, Ragtime is one of my top three shows.  People will leave feeling good.

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(L to R) Finn Clougherty, Jillian Griffin, Cristian Sack, Hannah Dwyer as Little Girl, Michael Hammond as Tateh, Barbara Baumgarten, Brenna Kenney, Melissa Carubia as Emma Goldman (on soapbox), Hilary Goodnow Photo courtesy of Zoe Bradford

SC:  Period pieces can be difficult from costuming to the fine details and Ragtime must be a monster to put together.

ZB:  It’s challenging, but we have our costumer Bree Plummer.  We would love to have her as a resident, but she is also a teacher so we get her when we can.  I work with a great team of designers including Ryan Barrow and James Valentin to make the most beautiful show possible.  We love period pieces because we can make it interesting.

I’m trying to let others set design because people have to carry the legacy on just in case.  I probably won’t ever retire, but will let people take over certain aspects.  As I let some things go, I plan to write more.

Company Theatre's  2018 'Ragtime'

(L to R) Hannah Dwyer of Scituate as Little Girl with Michael Hammond of Holbrook as her father Tateh Photo courtesy of Zoe Bradford

SC:  Spring Awakening also took place in the last five years, another daring show.

ZB:  I didn’t cut it, though it was handled carefully.  Though it happened in a different era, the themes are also relevant today and people need things they can relate to.  I also love a good score.  Steve Bass came on in 2016 and we’ve made him our resident Music Director and may keep him on indefinitely.  He’s a young, brilliant pianist and has his PhD from the Conservatory.

Company Theatre's musical, Spring Awakening

Company Theatre’s 2014 musical, ‘Spring Awakening’  Photo courtesy of The Company Theatre

SC:  You once said you chose popular shows that sell, but in the last few years, The Company Theatre has been delving into unchartered waters a bit.  Last year was haunted with Carrie the Musical and Lizzie Borden.

ZB:  It’s financially difficult to do that, but we are trying to give the young people what they want.  Lizzie Borden went well because people love local history and some said they have been to her house.  A gruesome tale, but it was also a nice psychological thriller.

We changed a little how we choose our shows, but we still have to please our general audience and offer something for the family, something mature, and our team knows their demographic well and what will be successful.

I’m passionate about big musicals and there’s nothing like the thrill of a live orchestra.  People in the professional theatre world, mentors, and colleagues say they will put eight pieces in here and do a lot of synthetic and prerecord.  You can make a lot of money that way, but we can’t do that.  Michael Joseph said that is standard while he was here and we’ve maintained it.

SC:  What shows do you still dream of doing?

ZB:  I’d love to do Wicked, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and I’m also waiting to do Mamma Mia!  We’ll get to it.  It’s all about rights and I’m sure there are new shows coming out that I’d love to get my hands on.

As a non-profit, whatever comes in has to support what we are doing and help us be self-sustaining.  Grants, gifts, and tax deductible donations are the key.  We have better opportunities for community support such as new packages for corporate sponsorship due to having higher end computer capabilities, a better website, and a brand new ticketing service that allows people who wish to support us to advertise.

SC:  What has been your most challenging musical?

ZB:  The Wizard of Oz because the movie is a masterpiece and any derivation from the film would be a disappointment for those who truly love it.  People would fight me on that, but if you take on The Wiz, you can do what you want because no one has a preset notion of it.  The Wiz was recently in Boston and the star of Ragtime portrayed the Wizard.

SC: What advice would you give someone taking on a business in theatre or similar?

ZB:  It’s highly competitive.  Know your vision, don’t give up, and try to think of something that someone else hasn’t already thought of.  Be fresh and original when you can and make sure people know of your existence without being obnoxious about it.  We still struggle with it.  Some people say they didn’t know a theatre is here.

The Company Theatre logo

Company Theatre’s logo, a design Zoe Bradford hand drew 40 years ago

SC:  What do you envision for the Company Theatre’s future?

ZB:  We have to keep growing and in our 40th year, we are finally setting up the Legacy Fund.  Our money rolls in and out with the tide as any non-profit would, but we’re actively fundraising to ensure another 40 years and beyond.

For the last ten years, I’ve wanted to design a new logo.  I remember sitting at a little drafting table back in the 70s and hand drew it when we didn’t have any money or resources.

With art being cut in classrooms and attending theatre in Boston can be so expensive, we’re looking to keep this going so it’s accessible for everyone and expand.  I can see us taking on more property and A.C.T. quadrupling over the next ten years.  We’re not a community theatre anymore, but a year round professional and we’ll evolve again.  We provide many jobs for people, but the other part of my vision is to create more jobs for artisans in the area.  The more people that are working and inspiring people, the better.

Click here for tickets or call the box office at 781-871-2787.  Located at 30 Accord Park Drive in Norwell, Massachusetts, click here on how to support the Company Theatre and be sure to follow them on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

 

Americana Theatre Company’s Michael Kirkland and Jennifer Martin talk bringing epic musical ‘Man of La Mancha’ to the South Shore

Americana Theatre Company is taking the South Shore on an epic quest in the multiple Tony Award-winning musical, Man of La Mancha at Spire Center for Performing Arts in Plymouth, Massachusetts through Sunday, July 29.  Starring TV personality Scott Wahle, a fascinating cast, and featuring a memorable score that includes the classic number, The Impossible Dream, Man of La Mancha is based on Cervantes’ masterpiece Don Quixote.

American Theatre Company’s Jennifer Martin and director Dr. Michael Kirkland discuss going through 500 audition tapes, their current season, and why Man of La Mancha sometimes felt like a farce.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Sleepless Critic:  This is your first time directing Man of La Mancha.

Michael Kirkland:  It is, but it is also my seventh La Mancha.  I’ve been blessed to portray Sancho Panza four times professionally.  I’ve also played The Barber, have choreographed the combat and violence in the show maybe six of the seven times, but have always longed to direct it.

SC:  Doing a show that many times makes you that much more prepared of what works and what doesn’t.

MK:  Directing the show is a real blessing because I have formulated well germinated ideas about the piece and I finally have an opportunity to experiment with those ideas, but I never lock myself out of the possibility of change.

SC:  Although Man of La Mancha is a comedy, Americana Theatre Company’s past production of The Three Musketeers also featured swordplay and took place in a similar time period.  Did the actors train the way they did for The Three Musketeers?

MK:  Yes, it is a physical show with combat fighting ranging from realistic to stylized to serious to comical narratives and techniques.  Similar challenges but different than swordplay.  Swordplay has more rules and challenges that come with it.  This is all hand to hand and found weapons, which are objects laying around that become unusual weapons.

SC:  Man of La Mancha’s The Impossible Dream in itself is epic.  So how did Americana decide to take on this show?

Jennifer Martin:  This is our third foray into musical theatre having taken on Grease and Lucky Stiff previously.  We try to choose stories that we believe matter, have great entertainment value, make our community better, and are ensemble driven.  Man of La Mancha is a storytelling, ensemble-driven show that works well with our company.  This show is great for that because Cervantes enters the prison and uses the prisoners to tell his story.

American Theatre Company Man of La Mancha

Scott Wahle as Don Quixote and Bethany Lauren James as Aldonza with Ruben Navarro as Sancho Panza

SC:  TV personality Scott Wahle stars as the Man of La Mancha.  He’s been in a few shows in the area such as Reagle Music Theatre of Greater Boston’s Guys and Dolls and Company Theatre’s Paragon Park.  He has a certain charisma and comic timing that fits Man of La Mancha.  How was the audition process?

JM:  We posted the audition on Backstage for our New York auditions and viewed about 500 audition videos for Aldonza, Sancho Panza, and Don Quixote (Cervantes).  After reviewing those videos, we traveled to New York and we did a full day of five minute audition slots.  We found Aldonza and Sancho Panza, but we still didn’t have our Man of La Mancha.  Americana’s President Peter Martin suggested his friend Scott Wahle.  Finding the Man of La Mancha was our actual quest and once we found him, everything fit into place.

SC:  What has been the show’s biggest challenge?

JM:  The first rehearsal process and making sure that above all, the words and richness of what was written is experienced by the audience while moving quickly.  The other challenge unique to our company is our four company members performing in the show are wearing multiple hats.  Managing Director David Friday plays The Governor and The Innkeeper while being the set builder and designer.  We’re doing a comedy, but sometimes it feels like a farce.

MK:  The concept we had settled upon affords an exploration of layers.  What I’m trying to communicate in this particular interpretation is even Cervantes does not completely understand the power of what he has written and it takes these prisoners and him watching how his story redeems them that truly brings home the power.

SC:  Man of La Mancha has something for everyone, but I think men will especially enjoy it.

MK:  It is a show with depth, substance, and great heart.  It also has some bite to it and aspects of it might be border line uncomfortable for people to experience.  I always think we can tell redemptive stories of girl scouts or in this particular instance, prostitutes.  The show makes a powerful statement by the end of this story.

Americana Theatre Company Man of La Mancha bow

The complete cast Photo credit to Denise Maccaferri

SC:  What’s been your favorite part of putting the show together?

MK:  I love to collaborate.  We had collaborative sessions on the telephone before we ever got here, just kicking around ideas then settling upon how we are to realize the conceptualization of the piece.  Then we start working with those people on a day to day basis bouncing ideas off each other, then trying things, and then trying them on the performers.  Theatre affords you what some more isolated performing arts don’t.  Theatre is created and performed in community.  Good ideas are great, and once it is on the stage, it’s not mine.  It’s ours.

SC:  The current season includes Man of La Mancha, Sleepy Hollow, and The Gifts of the Magi.  How do Americana select each season?

JM:  We look at what would be good for the town of Plymouth based on audience feedback of what they respond to, interested in, what they love, and what they are longing for.  We chose Man of La Mancha because we love the story, thought we could tell it well, and saw that it hasn’t been told for awhile in this area.

Our selection process takes about four months of thought and steady, hard work.  The Legend of Sleepy Hollow was chosen because we realize this area values holidays and traditional stories.  We thought of doing a one man version of Sleepy Hollow.  Our founding director Derek Martin is currently working on adapting the script and our Managing Director, David Friday, will be performing it.  We’re excited about performing an old, beautiful story in a simple, straight forward and creative manner.

The Gifts of the Magi is a lovely, six person musical so dear and true to the holiday season.  We wanted to tell a holiday story and keep the cast small in the wintertime because we want to perform it in the Center for the Arts, a small space.

SC:  Studio Americana youth program delves into a lot of big fantasy productions such as Peter Pan, Cinderella, The Wizard of Oz, and Alice in Wonderland.  I understand fall registration is still open.

JM:  Yes, registration is still open.  At Studio Americana, we work with each child individually which is why we keep the shows intentionally small so each student has an equal amount of time.  A lot of students say it’s the best part of their summer.

Studio Americana

Photo courtesy of Studio Americana

SC:  What do you envision the future of Americana Theatre Company?

JM:  We still are a bit of a secret in the South Shore.  We are blessed to have consistent five star reviews from people who come.  When people finally come, they say I can’t believe I’ve missed you guys.  We’re expanding our season with a cabaret and fundraiser in March, a show through July and have offerings in October. 

We’re a 501(c)3 company and have some great community sponsors.  As we get more support, we’d love to expand to a six show season where things are constantly happening.  People who come to Plymouth get the highest level of theatre across the United States, but we want our residents and guests to feel like this is also their hometown theater company.

Americana Theatre Company proudly presents Tony award-winning musical Man of La Mancha through July 29 at Spire Center for Performing Arts, 25 ½ Court Street in Plymouth, MA.  Click here for more information and tickets.  Click here for how to support Americana Theatre Company.  Follow Americana Theatre Company on Facebook and Twitter.

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Kristen H. Tremblay talks role in Hingham Civic Music Theatre’s ‘Cabaret’ to kick off 70th anniversary season

Hingham Civic Music Theatre (HCMT) is thrilled to kick off their 70th anniversary.  Over the past 7 decades, The Wizard of Oz, Rogers and Hammerstein’s Oklahoma, Young Frankenstein, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast and The Sound of Music are just a few of the wide range of musical productions HCMT has produced on the South Shore of Massachusetts.  They are launching their milestone season with award-winning spring musical, Cabaret, a captivating musical which celebrated its 50th anniversary just a couple of years ago.

HCMT Cabaret poster

Photo courtesy of Hingham Civic Music Theatre

Set in the Kit Kat Club in Berlin, Germany as the Nazi Party was rising to power, Cabaret focuses on nightclub girl Sally who becomes embroiled in a love triangle.  Winner of multiple Tony awards, Cabaret is known for its glamorous dance numbers while dealing with serious issues of the era.  The 1972 film was directed by dance legend Bob Fosse and starred Liza Minnelli in her star making role.  This show is not intended for children and contains mature themes.

Sleepless Critic caught up with Kristen H. Tremblay who will make her HCMT debut as Sally Bowles in Cabaret for two weekends only from Friday, April 20 through Sunday, April 29 at Sanborn Auditorium in Hingham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.

HCMT Kristen as Sally

Kristen H. Tremblay as Sally Bowles

Sleepless Critic:  How does it feel to star in the first show of Hingham Civic Music Theatre’s 70th season?  It is quite a milestone.

Kristen H. Tremblay:  I’m so thrilled to be playing a leading role in such a great show as part of this wonderful theater group’s 70th anniversary season! A very special honor for sure!

SC:  What do you like most about being part of Hingham Civic Music Theatre?

KHT:  This is my first production with Hingham Civic Music Theatre. They have such a wonderful reputation and it’s been great getting to know everyone in the group.

SC:  This season also includes the beloved musical, Annie this fall.  You star as Sally Bowles in Cabaret.  Have you ever done this show before?  What was the audition process like for you?

KHT:  I’m a classical soprano and usually play roles very different from Sally. As I get older, I’m trying to challenge myself by going out for roles that might be a stretch for me creatively. Sally Bowles is a complicated, meaty character and love every moment in her shoes.

I auditioned to challenge myself and because I have known the director, Nathan Fogg, for years and think he does great work. I didn’t think I had a shot at getting Sally, but felt really positive about my audition. The day after the audition, I was in line at the grocery store when I got the call. I was shocked and incredibly thrilled.

SC:  The multiple Tony award-winning musical, Cabaret celebrated its 50th anniversary a couple of years ago.  It is a unique musical with memorable songs such as Maybe This Time, Wilkommen, and its famous title track, Cabaret.  What was most challenging about this role?

KHT:  Sally is an iconic character in musical theater. There’s some intimidation associated with the pressure of doing her justice!  She has many sides to her and many intriguing levels. It’s been fun exploring how best to portray her.

HCMT Cabaret production photo 2

Aaron Stolicker as Emcee with cast in production photo

SC:  How has it been putting the show together?

KHT:  I adore everyone in this cast. They are such a fantastic group of kind, talented, and hard working people. We are having a blast and we all have deeply bonded. No question I’ve made lasting friendships.

SC:  What is the best reason one should see Hingham Civic Music Theatre’s Cabaret?

KHT:  Cabaret is a very different theatrical experience unlike anything else out there right now. It will not disappoint!  It’s edgy, honest, shocking, funny, and thought provoking.

Directed by Nathan Fogg, Hingham Civic Music Theatre proudly presents their spring musical, Cabaret for two weekends from Friday, April 20 through Sunday, April 29 at the Sanborn Auditorium, 210 Central Street in Hingham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Click here to take advantage of “Facebook Friday” offer exclusively for the April 20 performance.  Use password “pineapple” to get a pair of tickets for 35 dollars.  Follow HCMT on Facebook.

For Performing Arts news, interviews, reviews, and much more in Boston and beyond, follow us on Facebook @sleeplesscritic and subscribe.

Lexus Broadway in Boston presents musical spectacle ‘Wicked,’ returning by popular demand

A simple hat can make quite a statement.  Back by popular demand with its astounding sets, phosphorescent costumes, and multi-faceted story, Wicked is the Grammy and Tony award-winning musical spectacle that may make audiences reject those ruby slippers because Oz feels like home.  The award-winning musical Wicked, presented by Lexus Broadway in Boston, sweeps into the Boston Opera House once again on Wednesday, June 7 and will remain there through Sunday, July 23.  Click here for tickets and more information on Wicked.

Wicked Elphaba and Glinda Joan Marcus

Glinda and Elphaba Photo by Joan Marcus

Could Glinda the Good and young, ambitious, and somewhat naive Elphaba, before she became the Wicked Witch, actually have been friends?  What did happen before Dorothy and Toto arrived?   Based on Gregory Maguire’s best-selling book, Wicked: The Life and Times of the Wicked Witch of the West, the splendid musical adaptation, Wicked, introduces an entirely new way of interpreting L. Frank Baum’s classic tale, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.

Featuring a mix of beloved, familiar Oz characters while also introducing new ones, many parts of Wicked turn Oz on its ear in a clever and beguiling way, unraveling its own set of mysteries.  It also introduces a darker side to Oz, revealing deep, relatable issues of prejudice and balancing that with hope, love, and treasured moments of welcome humor.

Wicked arrives at the Boston Opera House, 539 Washington Street in Boston, Massachusetts from Wednesday, June 7 through Sunday, July 23.  Click here for more information and tickets.  Subscriptions and group tickets are also available. Click here for a closer look at Lexus Broadway in Boston’s 2017-18 season and follow Lexus Broadway in Boston on Facebook and Twitter.

Hingham Civic Music Theatre presents Rodgers and Hammerstein’s ‘Oklahoma!’ on beloved musical’s 75th anniversary

Hingham Civic Music Theatre, a theatre group whose most recent productions included The Wizard of Oz, Young Frankenstein, Once Upon a Mattress, and their most ambitious musical to date, Disney’s Beauty and the Beast, is going country.   This spring, Hingham Civic Music Theatre presents the Rodgers and Hammerstein’s Pulitzer Prize-winning musical, Oklahoma! in recognition of the show’s 75th anniversary.  Click here for a sneak peek.

HCMT's 'Oklahoma' cast

Frank Mellen as Ike Skidmore, Roy J. Harris as Andrew Carnes, and Erin Thomas as Ellen in ‘Oklahoma!’

A sweeping musical with suspense, comedy, romance, and some of Broadway’s most memorable numbers,  Hingham Civic Music Theatre proudly presents Oklahoma! for two weekends only from Saturday, April 22 through Sunday, April 30 at the Sanborn Auditorium in Hingham, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

HCMT's 'Oklahoma!' costume

Photo courtesy of Hingham Civic Music Theatre

Directed by Nathan Fogg and musically directed by Sandee Brayton with choreography by Tara Morrison, Oklahoma! is based on Green Grow the Lilacs, a 1931 play by Lynn Riggs.  Set in the Oklahoma territory at the turn of the century, settlers explore the beauty and dangers of life on the range where some may be facing their biggest challenge yet: love.  Oklahoma! includes an exciting array of popular musical numbers including People Will Say We’re In Love, Oh, What a Beautiful Morning, I Cain’t Say No, and the title track, Oklahoma.

HCMT's 'Oklahoma!' cast

Cowboy from ‘Oklahoma!’ Photo courtesy of Hingham Civic Music Theatre

Help support Hingham Civic Music Theatre as they raise money to upgrade their sound and lighting equipment for this production, their fall musical, Shrek, and for the quality of future shows.  Click here to be a part of this fundraising campaign.

For tickets and further details, click here or email hcmttickets@gmail.com.  Group and discount tickets are available.  All performances will be held at the Sanborn Auditorium, 210 Central Street in Hingham, Massachusetts and follow Hingham Civic Music Theatre on Facebook for upcoming events and more.