Jars of Clay, TobyMac, and For King and Country part of ‘Soulfest’s’ 20th anniversary concert celebration

Soulfest Full lineup

Credit to Gunstock Mountain Resort and Soulfest

Nestled in the White Mountains is a concert experience unlike any other.  Beautiful and uplifting, Soulfest is celebrating its 20th anniversary as a haven for fellowship and the Christian music scene in the stunning mountain setting from Thursday, August 3 through Saturday, August 5 at Gunstock Mountain in Gilford, NH.  In addition, this anniversary concert weekend will also include the Soulfest Kickoff Concert as well as the late night screening of the film, Priceless on Wednesday, August 2.  Click here for an inside look at this anniversary concert experience.

Soulfest Revolution

Soulfest concert scene Photo credit to Soulfest

Co-founded by Dan Russell in 1998, Soulfest annually features an incredible repertoire on multiple stages, featuring 80 musical guests and inspirational speakers over a three day weekend in August.  With this year’s theme entitled ‘Music, Love, Action,’ the Soulfest Kickoff Concert includes performances by Grammy and Dove Award winners Jars of Clay, The Violet Burning, Rachel Taylor, and Dan Russell.  A few highlights spread out over the Inside Out, Mercy Street, and Revival stages are For King and Country, TobyMac, Crowder, Derek Minor, Moriah Peters, Lacey Sturm, Kardia, Project 86, Epic Season, The Light of Hope, as well as acoustic performances on the Mountain Top stage from Chasing the Light, Christopher Williams, Big Kettle Drum, and more.  Click here for this year’s milestone lineup and for tickets.

Soulfest Kickoff Concert

Kickoff concert lineup Photo courtesy of Soulfest

Not only is Soulfest a monumental musical event, it is also packed with exciting and informative workshops by Grammy-winning singer-songwriters, professors, New York bestselling authors, and much more.  This year, the Justice Center stage includes Morning Worship hosted by The Salvation Army and Soulfest Open Mic, the Inside Out stage features Musician’s Workshop with Paul Colman as well as Catholic Mass with Matt Maher, and the Mercy Street stage features a few performers in The Songwriters Circle.  Soulfest also offers an opportunity to meet some of the acclaimed performers in the Meet and Greet/VIP Lounge.

Soulfest performers 2

Photo credit to Soulfest

Soulfest performers

Photo credit to Soulfest

Attendees are also invited to participate in activities onsite including Zip Line, Mini Golf, Paddleboats, Hiking, Mountain Biking, Kayaking, and more.  Kids’ activities zone includes an archery tent, video game hub, and there will also be a children’s ministry in front of a campfire.  Click here for more information.

Soulfest candlelight service

Candlelight service, part of Soulfest’s 20th anniversary celebration Photo credit to Soulfest

Soulfest is always looking for volunteers and are in need of 500 in order to run this three day festival.  Benefits of volunteering include free admission, free camping in volunteer section, and one free meal a day.   To learn about requirements and to register, click here.

Click here for full three day tickets, day passes, and evening passes.  Follow Soulfest on Twitter and Facebook for more details.

South Shore Theatre Works proudly presents stirring spring musical, ‘Children of Eden’

A little over thirty years ago, a new musical was born, loosely sharing the story of the world’s first family.  Based on the book by John Caird with music and lyrics by Academy Award-winning composer Stephen Schwartz, South Shore Theatre Works (SSTW) proudly presents the beloved spring musical, Children of Eden for one weekend only from Friday, May 12 through Sunday, May 14.  All performances take place at Stetson Hall in Randolph, Massachusetts.  A VIP reception will take place on opening night.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Directed by Richard Bento and musically directed by Henry Buck, Children of Eden, a musical loosely based on the book of Genesis, explores in a humorous and bittersweet way, the universal and ever complex relationship between parents and children. Children of Eden features well-known songs from the musical such as Generations, Strangers to the Rain, and Let There Be.

Performances for Children of Eden will be held on Friday, May 12 and Saturday, May 13 at 7:30 p.m.  One Sunday matinee will be held at 5 p.m.  Discount tickets are available for groups, seniors, and students.  Click here for tickets and more information.

South Shore Theatre Works is always looking for volunteers for a wide range of tasks including sewing, the box office, hanging up or designing a flyer or poster, or with media.  Click here for upcoming fundraisers and here on how to support South Shore Theatre Works.  Join their mailing list and learn how to become a member.  South Shore Theatre Works is also on Facebook.

 

REVIEW: Cohasset Dramatic Club proves life is too short to miss the insightful musical, ‘If/Then’

Mix in a dash of the Tony award-winning musical, Rent, a hint of HBO’s hit show, Sex and the City, and stir in the thought-provoking film, Sliding Doors, and what emerges is a real treat in Cohasset Dramatic Club’s musical drama, If/Then.  Set in New York City and based on a book by Tom Kitt, If/Then is an unpredictable, immersive tale that explores destiny, love, happiness, and the complexity of navigating through life’s surprises.

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Cohasset Dramatic Club is thrilled to debut “If/Then” through Saturday, March 25 Photo courtesy of Cohasset Dramatic Club

 

Cohasset Dramatic Club is thrilled to be the first in the US to present this stirring, humorous musical after its professional Broadway run and national tour.  Directed by Lisa Pratt and technically directed by Mark Bono, If/Then continues at Cohasset Town Hall in Cohasset, Massachusetts through Saturday, March 25.  Click here for more information and tickets.

Is the path to happiness completely random or is destiny derived from the right choices?  Elizabeth Vaughn, portrayed masterfully by Ann McCoy, is a successful urban planner who decides to make a fresh start in New York City.  Everyone seems to think they know what is best for her, which helps lead Elizabeth onto two, unexpected paths.

Featuring a vibrant cast with realistic conflicts and fleshed out characters, Ann McCoy as conflicted, soulful Elizabeth Vaughn is the heart of the show, a meaty role originated by Idina Menzel on Broadway.  Dressed in a sharp black pants suit, McCoy is more than up to the challenge, portraying a woman who was once certain of life’s direction, but lately, her confidence has waned.  McCoy impressively depicts Elizabeth’s cautiousness through a shift in her eyes and yet, also brings out the character’s lively impulsiveness.  She heeds other people’s advice, but ultimately follows her heart.  A soprano, Ann McCoy’s vocals dip and soar, hitting challenging notes with ease.  This is especially evident in the numbers, You Learn to Live Without and Always Starting Over.

One of McCoy’s greatest strengths is the natural, unique chemistry she shares with each cast member.  Elizabeth is single, but not lonely.  Michelle Margulies portrays Kate’s incredibly charming and outspoken friend.  Margulies as Kate is engaging, fun-loving, and a bit of a scene stealer.  She is Elizabeth’s biggest fan and only has her best interests at heart.  Perpetually optimistic, Margulies offers a soulful and comical rendition of the number, It’s a Sign, playfully engaging the crowd.

CDC If Then Ann McCoy and Michael Warner

Ann McCoy as Elizabeth and Michael Warner as Josh depict great chemistry in ‘If/Then’ Photo courtesy of Cohasset Dramatic Club

Ann McCoy and Michael Warner are local community talents known for various productions on the South Shore, shine in their roles.  Michael Warner is compelling as caring, forthright, and unassuming army surgeon Josh, a man also clearly torn between two life choices.  He delivers a touching rendition of the song, Hey Kid.  Elizabeth and Josh’s chemistry is hopeful and passionate.  They create great harmony together, especially during the song, Here I Go.

While Josh is practical, Ricky DeSisto is a natural as impulsive and endearing Lucas.  With his earnest, idealistic nature and fair share of cynicism, one cannot help but root for him through life.  Through lighthearted teasing and sweet glances, Elizabeth and Lucas have a warm, playful chemistry.    Their song together, Some Other Me is moving.  Rob Buckel-Gillis portrays hopeful, supportive David, a surgeon.  He is hopeful, likable, and optimistic.  Lucas and David share a tender duet, The Best Worst Mistake You Ever Made.

CDC If Then Michelle Margulies Ann McCoy and Ricky DeSisto

Michelle Marguies as Kate, Ann McCoy as Elizabeth and Ricky DeSisto as Lucas in ‘If/Then’ Photo courtesy of Cohasset Dramatic Club

Elegantly dressed in a suit and tie, Mike Nakashima portrays Stephen, a complex character with mysterious intentions.  Determined and serious, Stephen and Elizabeth share a career-minded camaraderie as he encourages her to follow her dreams, seeing her boundless potential.

With music and lyrics by Brian Yorkey,  an intimate band including Music Director Sarah Troxler on piano, guitarist Jack Byrne, percussionist Michael Hobbs, bassist Jon Lay, Clarinet/Flute/Saxophone Glenn Silvia, and Cassie Sulbaran on Viola bring to life this upbeat, contemporary musical with a libretto.  Clever blocking brings part of the band onstage.

Costume and props designer Irene Vifides lend to New York City’s urban vibe and signature style through big, designer purses, fashionable shoes, and impressive, colorful costumes that vary from sophisticated, city attire to a casual night in.  Scenic artist Denise Feeney and Scenic projection designers Erin and Patrick Dzierzak and Dramatic Sounds create urban ambiance with recreated city sounds, black and white city skylines, and a wealth of broad, colorful landscapes depicting a few of New York City’s most famous landmarks.  One of this show’s many highlights is the humorous depiction of NYC’s tiny apartments.  Cohasset Dramatic Club brings to life a captivating musical depicting how complicated life can be and proving it’s also too short to miss If/Then.

Directed by Lisa Pratt, musically directed by Sarah Troxler, and choreographed by Tara Morrison, Cohasset Dramatic Club presents If/Then through March 25 at 7:30.  All performances will be held at Cohasset Town Hall 41 Highland Ave in Cohasset, Massachusetts.   Click here for more information and for tickets.

Other ways to support Cohasset Dramatic Club is to become a volunteer and make a donation.  Sign up for their email list to learn about upcoming events and more.  Click here for more about the Cohasset Dramatic Club and follow them on Facebook.

Cohasset Dramatic Club presents the local premiere of the romantic musical, ‘If/Then’

It’s a story about love and the single woman in the Big City with a twist.  For Elizabeth, portrayed by Ann McCoy, a newly-single woman about to make a fresh start in New York City, life has become a world of daunting, yet wonderful possibilities.  From the producers of the Pulitzer prize-winning team behind the show, Next to Normal Cohasset Dramatic Club is proud to present the first non-professional production of If/Then, an insightful, contemporary musical about a recently divorced woman caught between choice and chance.

Originally starring Idina Menzel and based on a book by Tom Kitt with music and lyrics by Brian Yorkey, If/Then contains moving musical numbers such as A Map of New York, You Never Know, and Surprise.  Directed by Lisa Pratt, musically directed by Sarah Troxler, and choreographed by Tara Morrison, Cohasset Dramatic Club presents If/Then for two weekends only on March 17, 18, 23, 24, and 25 at 7:30.  One matinee performance takes place on March 19 at 2 p.m.  All performances will be held at Cohasset Town Hall at 41 Highland Ave in Cohasset, Massachusetts.   Click here for more information and for tickets.

Other ways to support Cohasset Dramatic Club is to become a volunteer, become a subscriber, and make a donation.  Sign up for their email list to learn about upcoming events and more.  Click here for more about the Cohasset Dramatic Club and follow them on Facebook.

New England Philharmonic President Ann Teixeira talks anniversary concert, NEP’s future plans, & more

New England Philharmonic President Ann Teixeira is often encouraging music lovers to broaden their horizons.  From taking field trips to see the Detroit Symphony Orchestra to becoming the President of the New England Philharmonic (NEP), Ann became a music lover at a young age having been exposed to a variety of music throughout her life.  The NEP offers a unique blend of contemporary and traditional classical music, which has enraptured audiences for decades.

The New England Philharmonic has a great deal to celebrate.  Led by Music Director Richard Pittman, who is starting his 20th anniversary year, New England Philharmonic presents its 40th Anniversary Concert:   A Child of Our Time. This exciting concert, featuring a number of special guests, soloists, and musicians, takes place at the Tsai Performance Center at Boston University on Saturday, March 4 at 8 p.m.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

Ann Teixeira gives an inside look at the NEP orchestra, shares her music background, fond memories with the New England Philharmonic, and NEP’s future plans.   The New England Philharmonic thrives on the support of the community.  Click here to support the NEP, sign up for their newsletter for upcoming performances, and more.

Jeanne Denizard:  What first inspired your love for music and what led you to pursue a career in the music industry?

Ann Teixeira:  I was fortunate to grow up in a suburb of Detroit, Michigan with an excellent and well-funded school system.  We took field trips to Detroit to hear the Detroit Symphony, attend plays, and visit the art museum.  I participated in music and art classes at school and had friends who took piano lessons, ballet, and acting.  That gave me a great deal of exposure to the arts and I found myself attracted to music.

By the time I was in junior high school, I was part of a music club and we attended performances.  I also took piano lessons until my piano teacher told my parents it was not a good use of their money.  That didn’t dampen my interest in music, but it did puncture a hole in my balloon.  Growing up in the 1950s, I was always exposed to classical music and the only contemporary or popular music I heard was on the radio.

JD:  Please tell me how you first got involved with New England Philharmonic.

AT:  At intermission at the Boston Symphony, I often chatted with a man I worked with a number of years ago and he was on the NEP board.  Seeing me at Symphony, he thought I might be interested in joining the board of an orchestra and asked if I’d be interested.  He told me about NEP and the rest is history.

I had been a member of the Board of Overseers of Opera Boston which had closed down about a year before and was wondering how I might get involved with another music organization.  That was spring 2012, and the New England Philharmonic had distinctive programming like Opera Boston, so I thought it would be a good fit for me.

JD:  What is it like as President of NEP?  I’m sure being part of the arts everyday is an exciting venture with its share of surprises.

AT:  It is interesting, challenging, gratifying, and demanding.  Having a Composer-in-Residence program with a volunteer orchestra, a Call for Scores competition, and a Young Artist Competition, NEP is unusual if not unique.  In Boston’s rich music environment, NEP’s programming, which includes composers and compositions without wide-name recognition and premieres of new works during almost every concert, makes it a constant challenge to attract an audience.  Though reviewers laud the challenge, creativity, and interest of NEP’s programs, it is challenging to fill the hall with people willing to try something new.

The surprise has been the success of the Chamber Players small ensembles from within the orchestra who have been welcomed by major institutions in the area to present chamber concerts, such as the Boston Athenaeum, the Peabody Essex Museum, the Children’s Museum, King’s Chapel, the Newton Library, and the Harvard Business School Chapel among others.  These ensembles are greatly expanding the audience for the NEP, and the musicians love the opportunity to prepare pieces written for quartets, quintets, and septets.

JD:  Do you have any exciting or memorable stories over your time in NEP that you’d like to share?

AT:  Several experiences stand out.  In April 2013, the NEP played former Composer-in-Residence Michael Gandolfi’s Chesapeake: Summer of 1814 which culminated with The Star Spangled Banner which was written in the summer of 1814, a piece just written that summer.  The chorus sings the verse we are know very quietly, and then sings three unfamiliar verses, rising in volume along with the orchestra for each subsequent verse.  It still gives me goose bumps.

Gunther Schuller, a good friend of our Music Director, Dick Pittman, whose music the NEP often played, continued to attend performances throughout his life.  In 2014, he was named NEP Composer Laureate.  The last time he attended a concert and spoke with the audience, he was in a wheelchair and quite weak.  His appearance at our concert may have been his last public appearance.  He died six weeks later.

I remember their fondness for the NEP and the generosity of former Composers-in-Residence who contributed compositions, fanfares to start the three principal concerts this season.  Robert Kyr, the first Composer-in-Residence, wrote a lovely tribute to the longevity of the NEP, its commitment to contemporary music, and the fact that there is only ‘one music.’

I am also so proud  for the NEP that The Boston Globe recognized NEP’s 2012 War Requiem by Benjamin Britten as the ‘best classical performance of 2012’ and ArtsFuse called NEP ‘best local musicians’.

The NEP Chamber Players emerged as a new component of the NEP, enthusiastically supported by musicians who already hold full-time jobs outside the NEP, play in the NEP and sometimes in other orchestras as well.  They have families and are still willing to take on new music in new ensembles playing in new venues, all for NEP’s benefit.

JD:  I understand part of what sets NEP apart from other orchestras is it is an all-volunteer orchestra with a composer-in-residence.  The NEP sets great stock in original, contemporary work and commissions a new work each season from its resident composer.

AT:  Yes, NEP is one of a few all-volunteer orchestras.  Ours is made up of trained musicians, many of them from major university schools of music and nationally-known conservatories who make their living in another profession including research scientists, physicians, a pilot, sales people, music teachers, and many other professions.  Dick Pittman’s challenging music programming requires substantial personal practice between orchestra rehearsals and sometimes section rehearsals.  Their time commitment to the NEP is mind-boggling and impressive.

The Composer-in-Residence and Call for Scores programs were established in 1985. The Call for Scores is an open competition.  Composers are invited to submit a recently composed work without regard to any theme or other programmatic criteria. The Composer-in-Residence writes a new composition each season to be premiered by the NEP, and he judges the compositions submitted to the Call for Scores competition, selecting finalists for review by the Music Director and their joint decision on a winner.

The winner almost always attends and speaks to the audience about the winning piece, when it is performed during the following season.  Thus the Composer in Residence program ensures a minimum of two premieres each season, one a world premiere and the other a Boston or U.S. premiere.

However, it is not unusual for each program during the season to a premiere of a recently composed piece.  Consistent with the NEP’s tagline: ‘Innovation and Tradition in Concert,’ every program includes several contemporary classical music and typically one lesser known or less frequently performed traditional classical piece.

JD:  Please tell me what other works you are looking forward to this season and what are NEP’s future plans?

AT:  Our final concert of this season is on April 29.  We are particularly looking forward to Concertmaster Dani Maddon’s annual performance as soloist for a violin concerto.  This year, it will be the world premiere of Current Composer-In-Residence David Rakowski’s Violin Concerto No.2 written for her to perform on this occasion.  Andy Vores and Bernard Hoffer also have written pieces for Dani to perform.

We also look forward to performing the Boston premiere and Call for Scores 2016 winner, Liliya Ugay’s Oblivion.  Former Composer-in-Residence Peter Child is also contributing a world premiere fanfare to open the concert.

The program is rounded out by Aaron Copland’s Orchestral Variations, Sebastian Currier’s Microsymph and Zoltan Kodaly’s Peacock Variations.  This program should be a wonderful end to the 40th Anniversary season.

New England Philharmonic presents the 40th Anniversary Concert:  A Child of Our Time at the Tsai Performance Center at Boston University on Saturday, March 4 at 8 p.m.  Click here for tickets, how to become a subscriber, and more.

New England Philharmonic President Ann Teixeira offers inside look at 40th Anniversary concert March 4

Led by Maestro Richard Pittman, the New England Philharmonic (NEP) has a stellar reputation for bringing magnificent works and uncovering promising masterpieces in each of their meticulously crafted concerts.  Music Director Richard Pittman is celebrating his 20th anniversary with the orchestra as New England Philharmonic presents its 40th anniversary concert featuring Michael Tippett’s stirring and thought-provoking A Child of Our Time with Chorus pro Musica under the direction of Jamie Kirsch.  This exciting concert will be held at Tsai Performance Center at Boston University on Saturday, March 4 at 8 p.m.  A number soloists and musicians are slated to perform at this special celebratory concert.  Click here for more information and for tickets.

New England Philharmonic President Ann Teixeira offers an inside look at how each season’s works are selected, their annual Call for Scores competition, and how to celebrate two anniversaries in one extraordinary night.

Jeanne Denizard:  How did this 40th anniversary season come together and how were the works selected?  I understand part of the process is NEP holds an annual Call for Scores competition.  Was there a specific theme involved this year?

Ann Teixeira:  Music Director Richard Pittman is responsible for the music selection each season.  Once the orchestra and Board know what he has chosen for the next season, the season’s theme is identified and each concert is given a title based on the relationship among the pieces.  When he selects a program’s theme in advance, it is almost always selected for the family concert.  This year’s family concert was called, The Big Bad Wolf.

JD:  On March 4, the NEP will hold an anniversary concert celebrating two anniversaries at Tsai Performance Center at 8 p.m.  A number of musicians and soloists will be returning for this big night.  What inspired highlighting these two significant anniversaries in one evening?

AT:  The orchestra is primarily celebrating NEP’s 40th anniversary, but this is also the first of Richard Pittman’s 20th year as Music Director.  We are fortunate to have a number of musicians who are long time members of the orchestra on stage for the 40th anniversary concert, including violinist Louise Myers, who joined it as early as its third concert in 1977, and 30-year NEP cellist Jennifer Snodgrass among others.

As the NEP did for its 30th and 35th Anniversary concerts, we will once again perform a vocal work that includes a chorus and vocal soloists.  For the 30th anniversary, it was Alban Berg’s opera Wozzeck and for the 35th anniversary, Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem.

The 40th Anniversary concert features Michael Tippett’s A Child of Our Time with Chorus pro Musica and soloists soprano Sarah Pelletier, mezzo-soprano Krista River, tenor Charles Blandy, and bass Sumner Thompson.  The NEP celebrates another anniversary as this same piece, also with Chorus pro Musica, was performed 25 years ago this season under Ron Feldman’s music direction.

JD:  This year also marks NEP’s 20th anniversary under the direction of award-winning Music Director and Maestro Richard Pittman.  Not only has he led the orchestra to a number of honors, but he has conducted orchestras all over the world and founded a distinguished ensemble, Boston Musica Viva.  Please tell me about how his presence enriched the NEP over the years.

AT:  Dick is a widely recognized and often honored conductor both in the U.S. and Europe.  He founded the Boston Musica Viva, an ensemble widely regarded as one of the best contemporary music ensembles in the world, 47 years ago.  He has enriched the NEP with his broad and deep knowledge of contemporary classical music and the high standards he applies to his repertoire selection.  He selects only the ‘best’ of contemporary classical music which not only utilizes as many instruments and musicians within each piece, but accommodate our part-time musicians.   Program selection is a balancing act!   The programming and training he provides leads to the orchestra’s musical growth and retention of them as well as higher quality performances often recognized by reviewers as equivalent to professional orchestras.

Composers are happy and honored to have the NEP select their compositions for performance due to Dick’s relationship with them.  The composers often attend the performance and speak to the audience about their composition and sometimes the process of composing it, enriching the concert experience.  Composers also sometimes attend a rehearsal, which further enriches the musicians’ experience and training.

JD:  This season features fanfares from former composers-in-residence.  This particular concert features Melospiza melodia from two-term composer-in-residence, Richard Cornell, who wrote this specifically for the anniversary.

AT:  Yes, Richard Cornell used song of the sparrow as his inspiration for this piece.

JD:  NEP features Michael Tippett’s  A Child of Our Time, which is inspired by what happened in Nazi Germany in the 1930s and is a significant work against oppression in the world.  Why this particular work?  I understand that it resonates especially with today’s world.

AT:  When Maestro Pittman selected A Child of Our Time a year ago, he had no prescience for how relevant its statements would be to the current political environment.  While it is explicitly a statement against oppression, it also progresses into a statement about tolerance, thus making it currently relevant on both dimensions.  It is serendipity, it is so relevant, and we hope it will leave its impact on the audience.

New England Philharmonic presents the 40th Anniversary Concert:  A Child of Our Time at the Tsai Performance Center at Boston University on Saturday, March 4 at 8 p.m.  Click here for tickets, how to become a subscriber, and more information.

The New England Philharmonic thrives on the support of the community.  Click here to support the NEP, volunteer, and sign up for their newsletter for upcoming performances and more.