REVIEW: Engrossing and unpredictable, Hub Theatre’s ‘The Clearing’ a fierce and resonating historical drama

After venturing to the second star to the right in Hub Theatre’s rollicking Peter Pan musical prequel in Peter and the Starcatcher, Hub Theatre Company of Boston kicked off its seventh season with a fierce and romantic historical drama exploring the aftermath of war and the cost of justice in Helen Edmunson’s The Clearing continuing through Saturday, April 20 at First Church Boston in Boston, Massachusetts. Tickets are available at a pay-what-you-can basis.  The show contains mature themes.  Click here for more information.

Hub Theatre's The Clearing

Photo courtesy of Hub Theatre Company of Boston

Engrossing and unpredictable, The Clearing reaches deep into the motives of loyalty and questions the very nature of what is right.  Taking place during 17th century Ireland after the Nine Year’s War and directed by Daniel Bourque, The Clearing is a beautiful, forbidden love story in the thick of a tense, tumultuous landscape and a transformative piece addressing issues that resonate in today’s culture.

The Clearing has a small cast and First Church Boston’s intimate setting, without a bad seat, makes it easy to immerse yourself into this compelling fictional tale set in historical times.  The Clearing’s set by Cassie Chapados has a natural, romantic flair, embellished by flowering trees, lamplight, and an open ceiling.  From lace to frill to gold, Erica Desautels and Nancy Ishara’s detailed, coordinated costumes capture the atmosphere of its time while Ian Conway’s impressive sound design helps to maintain the show’s intensity.

Not knowing much about the production prior to entering the theater made the show that much more enjoyable, but should mention the great chemistry between the cast.  Brashani Reece portrays Madeleine Preston, a wide-eyed and bubbly spitfire.  Reece as Madeleine is charismatic, stubborn, and charming, who often cannot see past her own heart.  She shares endearing, playful chemistry with Matthew Zahnzinger as naïve and adoring Robert.  With smiling eyes, Zahnzinger portrays Robert with mix of smugness and gentility and the two of them together make for some of the show’s best moments.  Although The Clearing is not a musical, Reece’s lovely rendition of an Irish lullaby makes for a sweet moment.

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Lily Steven depicts Killaine Farrell, Madeleine’s quiet and humble companion. With a far off gaze and a shy smile, Steven as Killaine draws sympathy in her painful selflessness, always longing to live in the past.  She and Reece have a sisterly connection.

Jeff Gill delivers a chilling, commanding performance as Sir Charles Sturman.  With beady, wrathful eyes, his righteous and brutal practicality is only weakened by an irksome ailment.  Although the entire cast is strong, his domineering presence will keep you transfixed.  Robin Abrahams depicts world-weary Susaneh, her dry humor makes for a few needed laughs in this mostly serious production.

Although Helen Edmunson’s The Clearing could have been heavy handed as it addresses issues such as culture clash and the lingering resentment of post-war politics, but director Daniel Bourque’s delicate balance achieves a fascinating and enlightening day at the theatre.

Hub Theatre Company of Boston presents Tony-nominated historical drama The Clearing through Saturday, April 20 at First Church Boston, 66 Marlborough Street in Boston, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and follow Hub Theatre Company on Facebook for further updates.

REVIEW:  Hub Theatre Company of Boston’s ‘Peter and the Starcatcher’ is funny, fascinating, but its best moments shine quietly

How did Peter Pan get his name?  What exactly is Pixie dust?  How did Peter become Hook’s sworn enemy?

The premise is promising.  From pirate to prawn, every cast member is a dynamic storyteller in Hub Theatre of Boston’s imaginative musical, Peter and the Starcatcher, a prequel of sorts to Peter Pan.  Featuring an energetic cast taking on multiple roles, a wealth of physical humor, and no shortage of wild comedy, Rick Elice’s Peter and the Starcatcher strings together the adventures that lead up to the legend of Peter Pan.

Hub Theatre of Boston Peter and the Starcatcher cast

Peter and the Starcatcher cast Photo courtesy of Hub Theatre Company of Boston

Directed by Sarah Gazdowicz with music direction by Bethany Aiken, Hub Theatre of Boston presents Peter and the Starcatcher, the final production of its sixth season, with recently added performances through Sunday, November 18 at First Church of Boston in Boston, Massachusetts.  Tickets are available at a pay-what-you-can basis.  Click here for more information.

Cassie Chapados’s detailed London set harbors clues from the classic Peter Pan story, but the actual performance seems to spring out of a child’s imagination.  The cast emerges from every side and each seat has a good view at First Church of Boston.  Peter and the Starcatcher is action-packed and respect is due for the sheer physical nature of this piece as this animated cast frequently and skillfully form human structures such as a ship and various scenarios as the story unfolds.

Peter and the Starcatcher group shot

L to R: Joey C. Pelletier as Black Stache and Michael John Ciszewski and the cast Photo courtesy of Hub Theatre Company of Boston

Dominated by dastardly pirates, Peter and the Star Catcher is full of captures, double crosses, commandeering ships, and overseas adventure.   Molly Kimmerling portrays Bill Slank with a sneer and a strut, a charismatic double crosser with a rock n roll edge.  Michael John Ciszewski as dimwitted, somewhat unhinged Smee and Joey C. Pelletier as swaggering Black Stache work well together in silly, over the top fun.

With inquisitive eyes and a star-crossed dress, Lauren Elias is no damsel in distress as eloquent, logical, and determined Molly Aster.  Much like her father Lord Aster in a commanding performance by Liz Adams, Molly’s plucky personality is a good match for Claire Koenig as lonely, forthright and naïve orphan known only as Boy.

Peter and the Starcatcher Boy

Claire Koenig as Boy with the cast Photo courtesy of Hub Theatre Company of Boston

The exploration of loneliness, faith, dreams of flying, and finding one’s place in the world is part of what inspires writers to expand and retell this timeless tale.  The improvisational, local, and at times, self referential humor ranges from what an older child would appreciate and features some adult humor as the show progresses.  The audience is so close to the action, it is also somewhat interactive at times.  Peter and the Starcatcher is packed with comedy and yet, it is the sweeter, quieter moments that give the production true heart.

Hub Theatre Company of Boston presents Peter and the Starcatcher through Sunday, November 18 at First Church of Boston in Boston, Massachusetts.  Click here for more information and tickets.  Get all of Hub Theatre Company of Boston’s upcoming events and more on Facebook.